Funding
 

Funding Opportunities

In order to strengthen current research aims, UCLA CTSI offers opportunities through assistance with grants and career openings to doctors and researchers who align themselves with the goals and methodologies of translational research. Learn more about these services and opportunities below and by viewing this presentation.

UCLA CTSI is committed to encouraging research by providing various funding opportunities for those who are interested in conducting research. By encouraging the growth of independent research and supporting translational team science, UCLA CTSI hopes to fortify the research community with new discoveries designed to deliver practical bedside applications.

See what Funding Opportunities are currently available below.

CTRC Seed Grant

Apply Here

The CTRC Seed Grant Program is designed to foster pilot studies that use CTRC facilities and staff with the goal of developing these into larger, successful, extramurally funded projects. CTSI expects to fund up to five proposals at each site under this RFP.

These Seed Grant Awards are expected to (1) lead to investigator initiated larger projects that will be appropriate for independent extramural funding, (2) make significant use of the CTRC services, especially nursing and nutrition, and (3) result in at least one peer-reviewed publication.

About the CTRC 
The Clinical and Transitional Research Centers (CTRC) at Cedars-Sinai, Charles Drew University, LA BioMed/Harbor-UCLA and the UCLA Westwood campus provide nursing, nutrition and laboratory support for outstanding clinical research, including clinical trials at all stages—phase I studies to multi-center trials. The centers are funded by the CTSI grant (NCATS UL1TR000124) to promote and assist in the conduct of clinical and translational research. The various sites have different expertise and availability of services, including inpatient stays, outpatient visits, bionutrition services and other servcies. www.ctsi.ucla.edu/ctrc

Seed Grant Program Eligibility
 To apply, applicants or mentors must be on the faculty at one of the UCLA CTSI partner institutions; faculty with academic appointments at UCLA, CDU, or Cedars-Sinai, are eligible. Collaboration among researchers at multiple campuses is encouraged and can be facilitated if needed. Researchers or emerging investigators focused on health disparities and/or disabilities are encouraged to apply.

LOI Submission 
The LOI is limited to 2500 characters in addition to NIH formatted biosketches for all investigators and collaborators. The LOI will need to be submitted in PDF format electronically. Applicants will be notified of their eligibility to submit a full application.

Deadlines
 Awards will be determined based on letter of intent (LOI) and project proposal with a maximum duration of 18 months.

  • Release of call for proposals March 14, 2014
  • Letter of intent due April 21, 2014
  • Notification of request for full proposal May 9, 2014
  • Full project proposal, if requested, due June 4, 2014
  • Projects awarded July 15, 2014 for immediate implementation

Future cycles of proposals are anticipated twice per year dependent on funding.

Please direct CTRC questions to:

For technical difficulties, contact Computing Technologies Research Lab (CTRL) at (310) 206-6556 or rfp-support@ctrl.ucla.edu.

For more information http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/opportunities/pages/ctrcseed.

I3T Team Science RFA

IMMUNITY, INFLAMMATION, INFECTION, AND TRANSPLANTATION (I3T) THEME
REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS FOR TEAM SCIENCE AWARDS

Posted: February 10, 2014
Letter of Intent Due Date: March 3, 2014
Letter of Intent Decisions: March 10, 2014
Application Due Date: April 28, 2014
Earliest Funding Date: June 1, 2014

Grant Type: Team Science Award
Award Period: One Year
Number of Awards: One or Two Each Year
Direct Costs: $200,000 Maximum

Hundreds of laboratories within the David Geffen School of Medicine, within CTSI partner institutions, and throughout the UCLA campus have research interests and expertise that are relevant to the recently established Theme in Immunity, Inflammation, Infection, and Transplantation (I3T) within the School of Medicine. Additionally, UCLA physicians and physician-scientists have expert knowledge of relevant clinical needs and access to patients and patient samples. Given this breadth of activity, it should be possible to assemble teams of basic researchers, physicians, and physician scientists, sometimes including engineers, public health researchers, and social scientists, to pursue major scientific challenges and unmet clinical needs. Although individual investigator-initiated research projects will continue to yield important advances, there is a growing realization that team efforts have lagged behind, despite the potential impact of projects that bring together researchers and clinicians with complementary expertise. Furthermore, more and more funding from the NIH and from other government agencies and private foundations is being devoted to team efforts, and team efforts are of greater interest to philanthropists and potential corporate partners.

With the above issues in mind, the UCLA I3T Theme, in partnership with the CTSI, announces its first round of Team Science Awards. Each applicant team must consist of at least three faculty from UCLA and/or a CTSI partner institution. Co-Investigators from other institutions are permitted, but only when added to a team that includes at least three faculty from UCLA or a CTSI partner. Research projects that address a specific clinical need and that involve both basic researchers and clinicians are of greatest interest, but any new collaborative effort will be given full consideration.

The five most important review criteria will be:

  • Scientific excellence and potential scientific or clinical impact
  • Record of accomplishments of the team members
  • Potential of the project to lead to a multi-investigator grant, a corporate partnership, or intellectual property
  • Extent to which the project addresses a clinical need
  • Extent to which the team includes researchers with diverse expertise, including clinical participants


The application timeline is listed above. Letters of intent (LOIs) should include a 1-2-page description of the project, the names and affiliations of key faculty participants in the project (please indicate the project leader), and NIH-style biosketches for each key participant. These documents should be assembled into a single PDF, which can be forwarded to Dion Baybridge at dbaybridge@mednet.ucla.edu.

Those who are invited to submit a full application should prepare an application according to the instructions for an NIH R21 application. Specifically, the application should include a one-page Specific Aims document, a six-page Research Strategies document that includes Significance, Innovation, and Approach sections, and a Literature Cited section. Preliminary results are not necessary, but should be included if available. These scientific sections should be accompanied by an NIH-style itemized budget and biosketches for each key participant. Copies of IRB and ARC approvals or status of applications should also be included.

2014 Multi-CTSI (UCLA and USC/CHLA) Healthy Aging in Los Angeles Team Science Award

In partnership with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS) and the Department of Public Health (LAC DPH), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), and the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute (SC CTSI) at the University of Southern California (USC) and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), announce the 2014 Multi-CTSI (UCLA; and USC/CHLA) Healthy Aging in Los Angeles Team Science Award to advance aging research and to promote healthy aging for older adults throughout Los Angeles County.

Purpose

The awards are designed to: (i) pursue the goal of healthy aging in Los Angeles County through collaborations with communities and community members; all appropriate levels of government; and practitioners of medicine, nursing, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, public health and mental health; and (ii) to advance the effort to develop, evaluate and disseminate a coordinated set of interventions intended to promote healthy aging in Los Angeles County.

Healthy aging is broadly conceived as relating to physical, emotional and social health. It involves diverse constructs such as physical activity and fitness, mobility, ability to age "in place," ability to take care of basic needs, maintenance of meaningful social interaction with others, and health care interventions that prevent, slow or mitigate the impact of chronic conditions among older populations, including mental health and substance use.

The target population of successful proposals should not focus exclusively on elderly populations. Applicants are encouraged to consider accelerated aging in minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged communities in selecting the target population. Populations aged 50 years and older should be the primary focus, recognizing that health benefits in the younger part of the continuum may not be immediately evident. Applicants are encouraged to consider multi-generational approaches to healthy aging, such as involving older individuals with school-age children or youth. While the primary focus is older populations, a life course orientation is encouraged within teams.

Examples of topical areas include but are not limited to: health behaviors, health literacy and self-management, and special/vulnerable populations. Proposals that focus exclusively on medical treatment for older adults without attention to other domains of health and well-being will not be considered responsive to this guidance. Multidisciplinary approaches are a requirement of team science funding.

Award

Each research team will receive up to $50,000 for a period of up to one year. These funds must be matched by an equal dollar amount or in-kind support from the home institution(s)/departments(s)/community partner. NIH guidelines for annual and end-of-project reporting will apply. Carry forward of funds is not allowed. Up to four awards will be funded.

Eligibility

Each application must include Co-PIs, with one from LAC DHS or DPH, and at least one associated from either the UCLA CTSI or SC CTSI at USC/CHLA.

Teams must include a partner from at least one community-based organization, including but not limited to health or service agencies and organizations, community clinics, health care or public health providers, policy makers and lay groups with health concerns. It is expected that investigators and community partners will participate fully and equitably in the research process. A CBO or FBO partner is eligible to serve as Co-PI.

UCLA CTSI
As PI: Faculty associated with UCLA and UCLA CTSI institutional partners (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science and Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center), and UCLA affiliates (VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and RAND), in any series (including adjunct and professional research)

As Co-PI (with eligible faculty PI): All personnel who are eligible to serve as PI, community partners, and postdoctoral scholars.

SC CTSI at USC/CHLA
As PI: Faculty associated with USC in any series (tenured/non-tenured, including adjunct and professional research); and CHLA investigators with a faculty-equivalent appointment

As Co-PI (with eligible faculty PI): All personnel who are eligible to serve as PI, community partners, postdoctoral scholars, residents, and clinical fellows

Priority

Proposals that facilitate research across UCLA, USC, CHLA and partner institutions or national CTSA consortium institutions will receive the highest priority.

Application

Format

Arial, 11-point font, half-inch margins on all sides, 8 ½ x 11 standard letter size

Requirements

All proposals must propose a new area of inquiry not currently supported by existing funding. This mechanism will not fund the continuation of an existing project unless the applicant can demonstrate how the proposed project is different from their current efforts.

Applicants should specify how the funding will strengthen the capacity of the CTSI program at their institution to undertake partnered research to pursue the goal of healthy aging in Los Angeles County. The intent is to prepare applicants for future research funding; applicants should specify the extramural funding mechanism being targeted. Acceptable funding mechanisms include but are not limited to NIH R01, R21, R03, PCORI, AHRQ, CDC, and CMS Center for Innovation.

Letter of Intent (LOI)

Co-PIs must submit their NIH biographical sketches along with a one-page LOI by March 10, 2014. Apply here.

The LOI must provide:

  1. Title of research proposal
  2. Names, institutions, telephone numbers and emails of the Co-PIs
  3. Rationale, significance, overall aims, innovation and impact
  4. Extramural multi-PI funding mechanism being targeted
  5. Statement of how the project meets the program intent
  6. CTSI program resources to be utilized at their institution. Examples include Health Services Research (HSR) consultation and biostatistical consultation.
  7. Total budget and source of institutional support (minimum 50% co-funding is required). LOIs will be scored using NIH criteria and local criteria (see Review Criteria). High-scoring LOIs will be invited to submit proposals.

Proposal Components

Narrative
Consists of a 250-word statement on how the project meets the program intent; one page of specific aims; and a research plan of three to five pages. There is no page limit for references.

The Research Plan will be scored based on the following criteria:

  1. Significance
  2. Innovation and impact
  3. Approach to be taken, including, but not confined to, study design; milestones to be achieved during the course of the project (a timeline is strongly recommended)
  4. Community engaged research aims addressed.
    • Promote and sustain bidirectional knowledge-sharing between community and academia.
    • Strengthen community infrastructure for sustainable, partnered research.
    • Drive innovation in community engagement that accelerates the volume and impact of partnered research in diverse communities.
    • Build health services research (HSR) methods into partnerships to accelerate design, production and wide adoption of evidence-based practice and behavior.
  5. Likely impact on the capacity of the CTSI and its partners to develop coordinated activities to implement, assess and disseminate interventions that will promote healthy aging in Los Angeles County
  6. UCLA CTSI and SC CTSI at USC/CHLA resources to be utilized
  7. Targeted, extramural multi-PI grant application with estimated submission and award dates
  8. Investigators and collaborative environment (this section must specifically address interactions between the teams and metrics to be employed to measure the success of the interaction).

Budgets
Budget and budget justification including personnel costs and other costs in NIH format are required. 50% matching is required. In-kind operational support is considered co-funding. Faculty from all partner institutions who receive salary support from the UCLA CTSI or SC CTSI at USC/CHLA should not request any additional salary support in the budget. No indirect costs are allowed.

Biographical Sketches
Compile all biographical sketches after the budget, starting with the Co-PIs followed by additional investigators in alphabetical order (limit 3 pages per biographical sketch).

Review Criteria

LOIs and proposals will be reviewed by a study section comprised of faculty and representatives from all sponsors (LAC DHS and DPH, UCLA CTSI, and SC CTSI at USC/CHLA), using NIH review criteria and the following additional criteria: likelihood of obtaining extramural funding, project sustainability, and alignment with program goals.

Funding Decisions

Allocation of funds will be based on scientific and technical merit, availability of funds, and relevance of the proposed project to program priorities as delineated above.

Submission Dates and Times

RFA release: February 3, 2014
Letter of Intent due: March 10, 2014
Letter of Intent acceptance notification: March 17, 2014
Proposal due: May 1, 2014
Awards announced: June 2, 2014
Start date: July 1, 2014

Additional Information

Awardees must provide their field of specialization, their NIH Commons ID and their IRB and/or IACUC numbers, if applicable, before funds are released. Recipients must credit NCATS and cite grant number UL1TR000124 (UCLA CTSI) and UL1TR000130 (SC CTSI at USC/CHLA) in publications that result from this funding.

Questions

UCLA CTSI
Contact Brittney Lee bnlee@mednet.ucla.edu. The CTSI Community Engagement Program will support linkage between LAC DHS and CTSI investigators who are seeking partners.

SC CTSI at USC/CHLA
Please contact the SC CTSI Pilot Funding program team (rd@sc-ctsi.org)

About the Sponsors

LAC Department of Health Services

The Department of Health Services provides acute and rehabilitative patient care, trains physicians and other health care clinicians, and conducts patient care-related research. It provides health services to over 700,000 residents in the Los Angeles County and operates four hospitals, including some of the nation's premiere academic medical centers through their affiliations with the University of Southern California School Of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine and the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. In addition, DHS operates six comprehensive health centers and multiple health centers throughout Los Angeles County, many in partnership with private, community-based providers.

LAC Department of Public Health

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health protects health, prevents disease, and promotes health and well being for all persons in Los Angeles County. Our focus is on the Los Angeles County population as a whole, and we conduct our activities through a network of public health professionals throughout the community. Every day, the population of Los Angeles is protected by hundreds of public health measures.

UCLA CTSI

UCLA CTSI is an academic-clinical partnership of UCLA, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science. Its mission is to translate scientific discoveries into health interventions that improve the well-being of Los Angeles residents. To achieve this mission, UCLA CTSI supports pilot studies, trains young researchers, and engages schools and communities in health improvement. It belongs to a national, NIH-supported network of 62 CTSIs.

SC CTSI at USC/CHLA

www.sc-ctsi.org

SC CTSI is part of the 62-member Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) national network funded through the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) at the National Institute of Health (NIH). Under the mandate of "Translating Science into Solutions for Better Health," SC CTSI provides a wide range of services, funding, and education for researchers and the community, and promotes online collaboration tools such as USC Profiles.

Iris Cantor Augmentation Grant


Funding Available for Augmentation of Major Research Grants:
Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center Executive Advisory Board/CTSI Awards

This award is open to the four CTSI partner institutions.

Pilot funding is available to augment currently funded NIH or major foundation grants for UCLA researchers, to promote exploration of sex and gender-based differences and women’s health research. Funds can be used to focus on, expand, or strengthen a research project’s applicability to women’s health.

Research Proposed Through Funding from the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health should be consistent with the mission of the Center:

The Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health seeks to promote comprehensive health care for women by providing support for research to understand human sex differences in health and disease and medical issues and diseases unique to women, as well as to develop and test clinical interventions for women. An equally important component of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health mission is training future leaders in women’s health research. Specific aims include:

  • To encourage and support interdisciplinary research in the field of women’s health and gender-based medicine, including:
    • To study medical issues (including reproductive issues) and diseases unique to women and more common in women 
    • To use established methods of health, utility, and cost measurement to assess and suggest ways to improve the cost effectiveness of clinical interventions for women. 
    • To promote research on sex at the cellular level, including how genetic sex differences influence cells, organs, organ systems, and organisms 
    • To study sex differences across the life span 
    • To study sex differences and similarities for human diseases that affect both sexes 
  • To train researchers capable of leading and conducting research programs that are consistent with the mission of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health 
  • To extend resources into the UCLA campus to increase the quality of women’s health research throughout the campus and to attract new and established researchers into women’s health research 
  • To study a wide range of populations in these research efforts, including women of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, and those who have been traditionally underrepresented in research studies 
  • To translate research findings into improvements in health care practice for women

A list of prior awarded projects is available at the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center Website: http://womenshealth.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=88.

Funding Amount Available: $30,000 one-year awards.

Pilot Submission Timeline and Selection Process

a. Submit a one-page letter of intent and full CV by e-mail for review. All submissions from interested UCLA faculty must be received by noon, Tuesday, January 28, 2014 (see contact information below). The letter should indicate/include:

  • Title, principal investigator, and start and end date of the grant funding to be augmented 
  • Abstract of planned project that will be supported by augmentation funds 
  • Relationship of planned project to Center mission and aims 
  • Long range research goals for this pilot work for future research 
  • Budget amount requested (investigators may request up to $30,000 for a one-year period). 
  • CV(s) of Principal Investigator(s) of the project to be supported by augmentation funds and NIH biosketch (attachments) 
  • Project summary/abstract of the research grant to be augmented(attachment) 
  • Letter of support from the principal investigator of the research grant to be augmented, if the submitting faculty member is not principal investigator of that grant

The Review Committee will review letters of intent and contact investigators whom they wish to submit full pilot proposals by Monday, April 1, 2014. Full proposals will be due Thursday, May 1, 2014. Funded projects will begin July 1, 2014 for the period July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015.

Criteria for selection include: (a) quality of the proposed research; (b) credentials of PI and Co-investigators (if included); (c) relatedness to the relevant Center theme and mission. Funding may be requested for any purpose which meets the needs of the investigator (s) and complies with UCLA policies for expenditure of funds. Please note that highest priority for the pilots will be given to supporting projects that would likely lead to R01s (or equivalent level funding from extramural sources) consistent with the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health mission within 2-3 years.

Submission of Letter of Intent
The letter of intent, full CVs, and other attachments should be e-mailed to the attention of Ryane Daniels, rdaniels@mednet.ucla.edu; (310-794-8063). The letter of intent, CV, and other requested materials must be received by noon, Tuesday, January 28, 2014. Any materials received after noon, Tuesday, January 28, 2014 will not be considered.

Iris Cantor Pilot Funding


Pilot Funding Available for Research in Women’s Health:
Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center Executive Advisory Board/CTSI Awards

This award is open to the four CTSI partner institutions.

Pilot funding is available for UCLA researchers who perform women’s health research, and/or research where exploration of sex and gender-based differences is relevant.

Research Proposed Through Funding from the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health should be consistent with the mission of the Center:

The Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health seeks to promote comprehensive health care for women by providing support for research to understand human sex differences in health and disease and medical issues and diseases unique to women, as well as to develop and test clinical interventions for women. An equally important component of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health mission is training future leaders in women’s health research. Specific aims include:

  • To encourage and support interdisciplinary research in the field of women’s health and gender-based medicine, including:
    • To study medical issues (including reproductive issues) and diseases unique to women and more common in women
    • To use established methods of health, utility, and cost measurement to assess and suggest ways to improve the cost effectiveness of clinical interventions for women.
    • To promote research on sex at the cellular level, including how genetic sex differences influence cells, organs, organ systems, and organisms
    • To study sex differences across the life span
    • To study sex differences and similarities for human diseases that affect both sexes
  • To train researchers capable of leading and conducting research programs that are consistent with the mission of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health
  • To extend resources into the UCLA campus to increase the quality of women’s health research throughout the campus and to attract new and established researchers into women’s health research
  • To study a wide range of populations in these research efforts, including women of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, and those who have been traditionally underrepresented in research studies
  • To translate research findings into improvements in health care practice for women

A list of prior awarded projects is available at the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center Website: http://womenshealth.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=88.

Funding Amount Available: $30,000 one-year pilot awards for all types of research

Pilot Submission Timeline and Selection Process
a. Submit a one-page letter of intent and full CV by e-mail for review. All submissions from interested UCLA faculty must be received by noon, Tuesday, January 28th, 2014 (see contact information below). The letter should indicate/include:

  • Abstract of planned pilot research project
  • Relationship of planned project to Center mission and aims
  • Long range research goals for this pilot work for future research
  • Whether the research is a new or augmented pilot research project
  • For applications that are attempting to collect additional preliminary data in response to recent grant application reviews: include a complete copy of the grant application review (attachment) and specifically identify the critique that will be addressed by the proposed work (in the letter of intent).
  • For any augmentation requests, how additional funds will strengthen current pilot and specify how increased budget amount would be used in your pilot work
  • Budget amount requested
  • CV(s) of Principal Investigator(s) and NIH biosketch (attachments)

  • Investigators may request up to $30,000 for a one-year period.

    The Review Committee will review letters of intent and contact investigators whom they wish to submit full pilot proposals by Monday, April 1, 2014. Full proposals will be due Thursday, May 1, 2014. Funded projects will begin July 1, 2014 for the period July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015.

    Criteria for selection include: (a) quality of the proposed research; (b) credentials of PI and Co-investigators (if included); (c) relatedness to the relevant Center theme and mission. Funding may be requested for any purpose which meets the needs of the investigator (s) and complies with UCLA policies for expenditure of funds. Please note that highest priority for the pilots will be given to pilots that would likely lead to R01s (or equivalent level funding from extramural sources) consistent with the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health mission within 2-3 years.

    Submission of Letter of Intent
    The letter of intent, full CVs, and other attachments should be e-mailed to the attention of Ryane Daniels, rdaniels@mednet.ucla.edu; (310-794-8063). The letter of intent, CV, and other requested materials must be received by noon, Tuesday, January 28, 2014. Any materials received after noon, Tuesday, January 28, 2014 will not be considered.

Iris Cantor Young Investigator Award


Fellowship Funding Available for Research in Women’s Health:
Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/CTSI Young Investigator Award

This award is open to the four CTSI partner institutions.

Fellowship funding is available for one Ph.D. candidate (including M.D. Ph.D. or other dual degree) or post-doctoral student engaged in research related to women’s health.

Funding from the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health should be consistent with the mission of the Center:

The Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health seeks to promote comprehensive health care for women by providing support for research to understand human sex differences in health and disease and medical issues and diseases unique to women, as well as to develop and test clinical interventions for women. An equally important component of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health mission is training future leaders in women’s health research. Specific aims include:

  • To encourage and support interdisciplinary research in the field of women’s health and gender-based medicine, including:
    • To study medical issues (including reproductive issues) and diseases unique to women or more common in women
    • To use established methods of health, utility, and cost measurement to assess and suggest ways to improve the cost effectiveness of clinical interventions for women.
    • To promote research on sex at the cellular level, including how genetic sex differences influence cells, organs, organ systems, and organisms
    • To study sex differences across the life span
    • To study sex differences and similarities for human diseases that affect both sexes
  • To train researchers capable of leading and conducting research programs that are consistent with the mission of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health
  • To extend resources into the UCLA campus to increase the quality of women’s health research throughout the campus and to attract new and established researchers into women’s health research
  • To study a wide range of populations in these research efforts, including women of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, and those who have been traditionally underrepresented in research studies
  • To translate research findings into improvements in health care practice for women

Fellowship Funding Amount Available: $20,000 one-year fellowship

Pilot Submission Timeline and Selection Process
a. Submit a one-page letter of intent, full CV and NIH biosketch of applicant, and letter of support and full CV and NIH biosketch of principal mentor by e-mail for review. All submissions from interested UCLA students must be received by noon, Tuesday, January 28, 2014 (see contact information below). The letter should indicate/include:

  • Summary of current research
  • Long range research goals and plans for future research
  • Budget specifying how the funds will be used
  • CV of proposed fellow and NIH biosketch (attachments)
  • Letter of support from principal mentor (attachment)
  • CV and NIH biosketch of principal mentor (attachments)

The Review Committee will review letters of intent and contact investigators whom they wish to submit additional information by Monday, April 1, 2014. Full proposals will be due Thursday, May 1, 2014. The fellowship will begin July 1, 2014 for the period July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015.

Criteria for selection include: (a) Potential of the applicant’s work to further research in women’s health; (b) credentials of the applicant and mentor, and (c) relatedness to the Center mission. Funding may be requested for any purpose which meets the needs of the investigator and complies with UCLA policies for expenditure of funds. Please note that highest priority for the fellowship will be given to applicants whose research trajectory makes it likely that they will ultimately qualify for a faculty position at UCLA or at another academic medical center or research institute as an independently funded researcher consistent with the mission of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center/UCLA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health.

Submission of Letter of Intent
The letter of intent, full CVs, and other attachments should be e-mailed to the attention of Ryane Daniels, rdaniels@mednet.ucla.edu; (310-794-8063). The letter of intent, CV, and other requested materials must be received by noon, Tuesday,  January 28, 2014 will not be considered.

UCLA Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) and CTSI Rapid Pilot Grants Program

UCLA Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) and

UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI)

Rapid Pilot Grants Program

Research Funding Available

October 2013

Announcement

The UCLA OAIC and the UCLA CTSI are soliciting applications for the Rapid Pilot Grants Program for aging-related basic, clinical and health services research. Award size will range from $1,000 to $10,000, dependent on scope of work.

The Principal Investigator (PI) must be a UCLA junior faculty member or advanced trainee, collaborating with a senior UCLA faculty member. A “rolling applications process” will be used. Applications will be accepted until the allocated funds for this program have been spent.

Eligibility criteria:

• The PI must be a UCLA junior faculty member or advanced trainee at the post-doctoral level (pre-doctoral students are not eligible) with an identified UCLA faculty mentor (the mentor will be the PI of record and responsible for the project).

• There must be an identified and committed senior mentor at UCLA.

• Because this award will provide limited, targeted support for a discrete need, junior faculty and their mentors must provide tangible evidence that the infrastructural environment to conduct the research will be provided.

Award criteria:

  • Proposed work must be responsive to the UCLA OAIC research theme (see next page). Applications that are not directly responsive to the mission will not be reviewed.

· Work must advance the independent research goals of the junior investigator.

· Results must have high likelihood of resulting in preliminary data for a larger research grant application and/or first-authored publication by the junior investigator.

· Applications that are aimed at collecting additional preliminary data in response to a recent, favorably scored, but not funded grant application are of particular interest.

· If the rapid pilot entails the study of human or animal subjects, an active IRB or IACUC approval must be in place at the time of the submission of the pilot application.

· Requested funding amount must be appropriate for the proposed work.

· Funds must be expended by June 30, 2014.


UCLA Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center

Center Mission

The UCLA Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) is designed to maintain and restore the independence of older persons. The UCLA Center’s theme is “Preventing Disease and Disability in Vulnerable Populations: a Translational Approach”.

We define vulnerable populations as 1) underserved (i.e., low income, uninsured, and minorities) or 2) at increased risk of losing independence because of chronic diseases or conditions, advanced age, or functional impairment. We define translational as overcoming two barriers to effective research. The first is the inability to transfer new understandings of diseasemechanisms gained in the laboratory into new diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive care. The secondis the inability to get results from clinical studies into everydayclinical practice and health decision making. In studying vulnerable populations, the UCLA OAIC emphasizes research that extends across the full spectrum of translational research. Within this theme, an important focus of the UCLA OAIC is on understanding the role of inflammation in disease and disability.

The UCLA OAIC addresses health disparities that vulnerable older persons face because of 1) inadequate understanding of contributors (e.g., socioeconomic status, inflammation) to health and specific illnesses (e.g., HIV, sleep disorders, depression), 2) lack of effective preventive or therapeutic approaches (biomedical and behavioral), or 3) inadequate ability to get needed treatment to vulnerable older populations (e.g., cultural barriers, ineffective health systems). It also helps overcome the barriers between the promise of basicscience research and the delivery of better health.

The Center stimulates scientific discovery through 4 Resource Cores (Recruitment and Retention, Research Operations, Analysis and Cost-effectiveness, and Inflammatory Biology), a Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core, a Research Career Development Core, and a Leadership/Administrative Core.

The UCLA OAIC specific aims are:

1) To provide intellectual leadership for research on the Center’s theme, Preventing Disease and Disability in Vulnerable Populations

2) To stimulate T1 and T2 translational research addressing the Center’s theme by consultation, provision of services, and collaboration through 4 resource cores

3) To engage the Los Angeles community in the conduct of OAIC research

4) To foster career development of future research leaders through Career Development Awards

5) To nurture novel ideas by funding rapid pilot awards

6) To collaborate with other NIH-funded (e.g., CTSI, RCMAR, L.A. CAPRA, Demography Center) and foundation-funded (e.g., Hartford Center of Excellence) efforts that support the UCLA OAIC’s mission


RAPID GRANT APPLICATION PROCESS

Submit an application packet via e-mail to Lucio Arruda. Note that awards will be made on an ongoing basis until program funds are exhausted. Interested applicants should contact Lucio Arruda before submitting to ensure that funds are still available (please see contact information below).

The application packet must include the following:

A 3-page application, single spaced using Arial font 11-point typeface, with one-inch margins, which includes the following:

a) Relevance: explicit statement about responsiveness of the research to OAIC theme

b) Primary research questions and hypotheses

c) Brief background and significance

d) Brief methods including discussion of sample size

e) Timeline (note expenditure deadline)

f) Specific statement about how data will result in one or more of the following: a revised grant application; a new grant application; a manuscript

g) Proposed use of pilot funding (~5 sentences describing the amount of funding requested, the exact intended use of the funds, and why this funding is instrumental to the success of the project)

Also include:

a) Biosketches and the NIH Commons User Name of all Investigators;

b) IRB or Animal Use approval numbers as appropriate (because of the rapid turnaround time, proposals that require IRB or Animal Use approval must have this approval at the time of application.

c) Mentor’s letter that includes explicit description of the infrastructural support that will be available to the pilot project and the nature and amount of mentorship that will be provided.

d) For applications that are attempting to collect additional preliminary data in response to recent grant application reviews: include a complete copy of the grant application review and specifically identify the critique that will be addressed by the proposed work.

Funding decisions will be make within 4 weeks of receipt. Successful applicants must agree to submit progress reports, present their findings at local Pepper Center meetings, and cite the UCLA Pepper Center and the UCLA CTSI on all publications related to the support.

The application packet should be e-mailed to the attention of:

Lucio Arruda

UCLA Division of Geriatrics larruda@mednet.ucla.edu

310-825-8253


Co-Sponsorship

The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI)

The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (UCLA CTSI) is co-sponsoring the UCLA-OAIC rapid pilot program. A brief description of the UCLA-CTSI follows. Please note that the successful UCLA OAIC-CTSI rapid pilot applicant must be responsive to the UCLA OAIC research mission, described above.

The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (UCLA CTSI) provides the infrastructure to bring UCLA innovations and resources to bear on the greatest health needs of Los Angeles and the nation. It is a dynamic partnership among UCLA Westwood, Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor UCLA Medical Center, the Burns and Allen Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and our Los Angeles community. It is one of 60 NIH-funded CTSIs nationwide.

The UCLA CTSI is organized into nine program areas, which are briefly described below. These program areas are the vehicles through which it CTSI achieves its five main goals: (1) create an academic home for clinical and translational science; (2) build transdisciplinary research teams to accelerate and translate discovery; (3) build and expands strong bi-directional academic-community partnerships; (4) transform educational and career development programs to promote the next generation of clinician investigators and translational scientists; and (5) serve as a national resource for collaborative research.

Pilot and Collaborative Translational and Clinical Studies Program (Pilot/ Collaborative Program) drives research within the UCLA CTSI. It assembles new transdisciplinary teams among senior and junior investigators; provides seed funding; fosters collaborations among basic, clinical and community researchers; provides funding for development of novel methodologies and assists the transition of research from preclinical to Phase I clinical trials; recruits new translational faculty.

Community Engagement in Research Program (CERP) is the primary link to our diverse Los Angeles community. It strengthens and builds strong bi-directional partnerships that help CTSI scientists identify research relevant to community needs. CERP builds community capacity to engage in research; communicates research findings; serves as a point of contact for community health care providers and facilitates opportunities for health services and comparative effectiveness research.

Center for Translational Technologies (CTT) links scientific teams with core technologies. It provides online access to and supervises the use of a diverse array of existing cores; supports development of new technologies; provides personalized counseling to help investigators select and use cores; and facilitates multidisciplinary collaborations and networking.

Clinical and Community Research Resources Program (CCRR ) supports and supervises human studies and clinical trials. It builds on our highly successful GCRCs to include flexible, mobile research units that bring scientific teams to our population. It provides bio-nutrition services, clinical research management, and clinical education and training opportunities.

Regulatory Support and Ethics Research ensures that our research is in full regulatory compliance and meets the highest quality assurance standards. It actively seeks and encourages industry alliances and offers ethics counseling and research.

Biomedical Informatics Program (BIP) leverages our expertise and resources in data management to provide databases, tools, resources and infrastructure for the acquisition, storage and analysis of data. It provides the online infrastructure and support for the Office of Investigator Services.

Biostatistics and Computational Biology (BCB) leverages our existing strengths and resources to provide one-stop biostatistical design and data management services to CTSI research teams. It fosters development of novel clinical trial designs and biostatistical methodologies; operates a secure, user-friendly CDM system; and offers expanded translational science courses in clinical trials methodology and new methods in biostatistics and modeling.

Research Education, Training and Career Development (CTSI-ED) houses most of our education and training activities. It builds on collaborations with other CTSI programs to identify training and education needs and opportunities. It ensures CTSI trainees acquire the core competencies needed to conduct multidisciplinary research, and to integrate community priorities and input into research across the translational spectrum.

Evaluation & Tracking (E/T) helps CTSI leaders set goals, measure outcomes, inform leadership decision-making, and identify opportunities for improvement. It conducts studies to improve the science of evaluations, and collaborates with other CTSI researchers to evaluate strategies to boost the speed and efficiency of translation.

How to co-fund a Team Science Award

Team Science Awards support, multidisciplinary teams and enable them to obtain preliminary data for extramural grants. They are co-funded by CTSI and other entities (e.g., departments or centers) and issued in amounts ranging from $25,000 to $200,000 for one or two years. They are non-renewable and awarded through competitive, peer-review using an open RFA.

Partnering with CTSI

To initiate the process, a department, center, ORU, etc. must send a letter of intent (LOI) to Dion Baybridge, Director of Research at the David Geffen School of Medicine, at dbaybridge@mednet.ucla.edu.

The LOI must include:

  1. the scientific focus of the proposed RFA
  2. an administrative leadership plan
  3. total award and total non-CTSI co-funding (minimum non-CTSI share is 50% of award)

CTRC Seed Grant Awardees

2014

Effects of Exercise Training on Cardiac Structure and Function in Prediabetes Using 3D Cardiac MRI Technology
Christian Roberts
Development of a novel biomarker for liver fibrosis Simon Beaven
A new anxiety treatment through augmented interoceptive exposure training Sahib Khalsa
Brain connectivity and structure pain inhibition and gut microbiota in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome Jennie Tsao
Kirsten Tillisch

2013

Brain Responses Associated with Ingestive Behavior in Obese Patients: The Effects of Bariatric Surgery, and their Association with Behavioral and Satiety Signal Responses
Dutson, Erik
The Effects of Vitamin D3 versus 25OHD3 Supplementation on Serum Vitamin D Metabolites and Markers of Mineral Metabolism and Immune Function Shieh, Albert
Dose-Response Relationship of Tenofovir with HIV-1 Suppression in Ex-Vivo Model of Tissue Infectibility in Adolescents Kordy, Kattayoun
Repositioning Ivermectin for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders Ray, Lara
Mechanism of B-cell Activation and Hyperreactivity-Induced Sensitization Post Mechanical Circulatory Support Device Insertion Kwon, Murray
Does Reversal of Melatonin Deficiency in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Lead to Preservation of Insulin Secretion and Glucose Control? Matveyenko, Aleksey

Junior Faculty Mentored-Research Award

Chrisandra Shufelt Cardiology Estrogen Deficiency and Cardiovascular Disease in Premenopausal Women
Heather Jones
Acute Lung Injury and Effects of NAMPT and NAM in Modulating Lung Inflammation
Bahman Chavoshan Medicine/GIM The role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the pathophysiology of COPD skeletal muscle dysfunction
Anuja Shah Medicine/GIM Metabolic Effect of Different Sources of Dietary Phosphorus
James Byrne Pharmacology Investigating the Potential of Reprogrammed Pluripotent Stem Cells for Patien-Specific Cellular Immunophenotyping to Differentiate Infection from Rejecting in Inestinal Transplantation
Laura Wozniak Pediatrics Develpment of Peer-Led Smoking Cessation
Elizabeth Bromley Psychiatry Intervention for Individuals with Severe Mental Illness
Denis Evseenko Orthopaedic Surgery Inhibition of the lysophoshatidic acid signaling as a novel strategy for restoration of posttraumatic cartilage
Edward Lee Radiological Sciences Potential application of Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in the treatment of pancreatic cancer
Yoon-Hee Cha Neurology Functional Neuroimaging and Neuromodulation in Mal de Debarquement Syndrome
Paul Tumeh Medicine/Dermatology A Needle-Free Nanovaccine Against Melanoma
Thao Nguyen Medicine/Cardiology Fibrosis, Stress, and Ventricular Arrhythmias

Catalyst Grant

Elain Reed Pathology UCLA & Roche Collaboration to Use Next-Generation, High-Throughput Screening to Characterize Varialble Receptor Reperitories of T Cells and Natural Killer Cells
Roy Doumani Pharmacology BSC-CTSI University Entrepreneurship Seminar Series
Oliver Hankinson Pathology Support for Meetings of the UCLA Molecular Toxicology Program
Elizabeta Nemeth Medicine/Pulmonary Estrogen Deficiency and Cardiovascular Disease in Premenopausal Women
Karen Lyons Orthopaedic Surgery Regenerative Musculoskeletal Medicine Training Program Seminar Series
James Wascheck Psychiatry Immunology in Neuroscience Mini-symposium
Carol Mangione Medicine/GIM Scientific Retreat, Co-sponsored by UCLA/DCU RCMAR/CHIME, CUD/UCLA Project EXPORT, and UCLA CTSI

Team Science

Gerald Kominski Public Health Los Angeles County Community Health Profile Project:A  "Hot Spt" Analysis
Debika Bhattacharya Medicine/Infectious Diseases Cardiovascular and Metabolic Complications of HIV/HCV Co-Infection
Irvin Chen Microbiology, Immunology,
and Molecular Genetics
AIDS
Linda Liau Neurosurgery Immune and Gene Therapy
Yibin Wang Anesthesiology/Medicine Systems Genetics of Heart Failure: Paving the Road to Translation

Core Voucher

UCLA (1) Winter 2012



Christian Roberts Endothelial Progenitor Cell Quantification in Smokers by a Novel Gating Strategy: Effects of Resistance Training and Nicotine Replacement
Timothy R Donahue Targeting the chemotherapy-resistant epigenetic reprogramming of stromal cells in human pancreatic cancer
Andrew Dean Neurobehavioral Predictors of Cognitive Decline in Methamphetamine Dependence
Philip Liu Defining M. tuberculosis virulence through the genomic interactome
Joanna Schaenman Analysis of immune control of BK virus replication after kidney transplantation
Jeffrey L. Veale Monitoring Renal Allograft Dysfunction by Utilizing a Multiplexing Electrochemical Sensor to Measure Combinational Biomarkers: Creatinine and Cystatin-C
Sanaz Memarzadeh Preclinical trial to assess effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in targeting endometrial cancer
Zoran Galic Gene expression analysis of the hESC-derived T lineage cells
Daniel Cruz Deciphering human innate immune networks governed by the microenvironment
Edmond H. Teng Validation of Plasma Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in an Animal Model
Brent Fogel Rare and Novel Genetic Variation in Cerebellar Ataxia
Sepideh Hagvall De-differentiated fat as a cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering
Laura Wozniak Unique Adaptive and Innate Immune Cell Profiles in Tolerant Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients
Susan Krum-Miranda Estrogen-dependent control of osteoblast-derived collagen architecture
Richard C. Koya Study of advantageous phenotypic changes in T cells for adoptive cell transfer therapy for melanoma induced by the mutant BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib
Sophie Deng Bioengineering of human limbal stem cells
Fang Wei Non-invasive detection of exosomal Lung Cancer EGFR gene mutations by Electric Field Induced Release and Measurement (EFIRM)
Denis Evseenko Isolation and characterization of human cartilage progenitors
Eileen Tsai Identification of Plasma Proteins from Biomarker Candidates that Predict Acute Rejection and Monitor Non-adherence in Pediatric Renal Transplantation
Paul Camille Tumeh A High Throughput Platform to Identify Small Molecules that Enhance T-cell Mediated Melanoma Immunotherapy
Stephen Bensinger Determining the influence of SREBP on HCV pathogenesis
Giovanni Coppola Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons to Understand C9ORF72-mediated neurodegeneration
Alistair J. Cochran Genetic basis of the biology of melanoma metastases
Betty P.T. Tsao Establishment of relational databases for lupus genetic study
Cathy Lee Metabolic Effects of Androgenicity in Aging Men and Women
Daniel Geschwind Treatment of autism-related behavior in the Cntnap2 knockout mouse model
Danny JJ Wang Virtual Lumbar Puncture using MRI
Donald Kohn High Through-Put Screening to Improve Gene Transduction of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Elizabeta Nemeth New drug leads for iron overload
Eric Hoek High Throughput Screening of Infection Resistant Coating Films
Eric Vilain Improving Diagnosis of Disorders of Sex Development by Whole Exome Sequencing
Fritz Eilber Preclinical Imaging of Genetically Engineered and Direct-Patient Xenograft Models of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors
Gal Bitan A mouse toxicity study of a novel drug candidate
Jonathan Braun Mucosal proteome in HIV infection
Lee Goodglick Construction of a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Tissue Array for Translational Research
Patricia A. Ganz Young Breast Cancer Survivorship Program
Roger Lo Integrated genomic analysis of melanoma response to BRAF inhibition
Ronald Mitsuyasu CFAR/UCLA HIV Research Study Volunteer Project
Timothy R Donahue Targeting the chemotherapy-resistant epigenetic reprogramming of stromal cells in human pancreatic cancer



Charles Drew University (1) Winter 2012



Amira Brown (CDU) Evaluating dopaminergic gene expression in subcortical brain regions of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice
Shehla Pervin (CDU) Targeting pERK1/2 in Mammary Cancer Stem Cells
John Elshimali (CDU) Epigenetic examination of potential genes involved in drug resistance in different types of prostate cancer cells



Cedars-Sinai (1) Summer 2012



Bekir Cinar Evaluation of Tumorigenesis by Optical Imaging in Live Animals
Yelena Bykhovskaya High-throughput sequencing of linkage region in multi-generational family with dominant keratoconus
Melodie Metzger The Relationship between Experimental Serum Vitamin D Levels and Spinal Fusion Strength: a Quantitative Analysis
Ke Cheng Identification of the functional ingredient(s) of cardiosphere-derived cells
Viorica Ionut The role of gut-brain communication in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and in T2DM remission after bariatric surgery using fMRI
Wen Chin Huang SREBP-1/ROS/AR signaling Promotes Prostate Cancer Castration-resistant Progression
Vaithi Arumugaswami Hepatitis C Virus Clinical Isolates From HCV-HIV Co-infected Patients for Vaccine Development.
Philip Frykman Fungal Microbiome in Children with Hirschsprung Associated Enterocolitis
Bill Wilcox High-throughput Drug Screening to Find a Small Molecule Treatment for Achondroplasia
Hyung Kim Development of Prostate MRI for Active Surveillance
Biagio Saitta Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Create In Vitro Model of Skeletal Dysplasias.
Miklos Peterfy In vivo validation of novel genes in lipid metabolism and coronary artery disease
Rivkah Gonsky Functional Relevance of Epigenetic Modifications in IBD
Mark Pimentel Deep Sequencing the Small Bowel Microbiome: Role in Human Disease
Robert Barrett Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from CrohnåÕs disease patients using EBV transformed B-cell lines.
Sandra Orsulic Development of an Assay to Predict Outcome in Multiple Cancer Types



LA-BioMed-Harbor UCLA (1) Summer 2012



Lin Lin Differentiation pluripotent stem cells into mature neutrophils
Peter Liu Testosterone and estradiol pulsatility in men with OSA
Tsui-Fen Chou Quantitative Cell-based Screens to Identify Drugs and Targets Within the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System
Rebecca Stockton In Vivo Cerebrovascular Imaging of Mouse Cerebral Cavernous Malformations
Kevin Bruhn Subversion of Host Defense Pathways by Visceralizing Leishmania Species
Michael Yeaman Innovative Anti-Infective Agents & Strategies
Ashraf S. Ibrahim Molecular Diagnostics of Mucormycosis
Noah Craft Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis with Topically Applied TLR Agonists
Yan Xiong Early agr activation is a key pathogenic signature in persistent MRSA bacteremia
Yanhe Lue Histone Demethylase in XY and XXY Male Germ Cells



UCLA (2) Fall 2012



Roger Lo Whole-exome sequencing of single circulating melanoma cells: tumor heterogeneity and BRAF targeted therapy.
Satiro De Oliveira Anti-leukemic Immunotherapy Using Modification of Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Jorge Torres Inhibition of STARD9 in Cancer
Amy C. Rowat Cancer Prognosis and Treatment by High Throughput Mechanical Screening
Kara Calkins Fish Oil: A Novel Therapy for Pediatric Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease
David Shackelford Develop novel therapeutic strategies to target LKB1/STK11 deficient non-small cell lung cancer
Zhong Zheng Silver nanoparticle coated titanium: an antimicrobial and osteoinductive material for orthopedic device fabrication
Heather R. Christofk Role of MCT1 in cancer metabolism
Pascal F. Egea Structure-Based Discovery and Design of Novel Anti-malarials
Reza Ardehali A clonal analysis approach for cardiovascular regeneration
Erina Vlashi Role of Erythropoietin in Breast Cancer Stem Cells
James Byrne Pre-clinical transcriptional analysis of human osteogenic dermal mesenchymal stem cells
Matthew Shtrahman Development of a Novel Test for Seizure Threshold
David Brooks IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION DURING PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTION
Aydogan Ozcan Metallic Nanoparticles Enhanced Recognition of CD4+ T Cells by Lensfree On-Chip Imaging
Debora Farber Microarray analysis of genes involved in retinal pigment epithelium melanogenesis, a process that is abnormal in ocular albinism.
Xiangdong William Yang Cell-based screening for disease modifying chemical compounds for HuntingtonåÕs disease
Jane Deng Correlation between alterations in gene expression and the nasal microbiome following viral infections
Jau-Nian Chen In vivo chemical suppressor screen for cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure.
Dino DiCarlo Role of biomechanical single-cell analysis in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer stem cells
Eric Hoek Antibacterial Self-Doped Polyaniline Coating Films For Biofouling Control On Medical Devices
J. David Jentsch Identifying Genomic Loci Influencing a Translational Measure of Risk-Taking Temperament
Leonard H. Rome Vault Nanoparticle Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer
Christopher S. Colwell Non-dipping hypertension in HuntingtonåÕs disease
David B. Reuben Facilitating Community Services for Dementia Patients
Katherine Narr Biomarkers of Ketamine response in Major Depression
Mario Deng Comprehensive Biomarker-based Classification of the Endomyocardial Biopsy
Rachelle H. Crosbie-Watson A novel gene therapy approach for treatment of cardiomyopathy
Yin Tintut Regulation of PTH-induced Osteoanabolism by Inflammatory Lipids
Theodore F. Robles Using LC-tandem mass spectrometry to identify salivary biomarkers predicting post-traumatic stress disorder in trauma patients
Asim Dasgupta A Novel Anti-viral Approach using Thymidine Kinase Monoclonal Antibody
Berit Kerner Exome å–Sequencing in Bipolar Disorder
Kang Ting Fibromodulin reprogrammed cells for bone regeneration
Larry F. Hoffman Oxidative stress and neuroprotection in inner ear sensory epithelia
Robert T. Clubb Screen to discover novel Anti-infective agents
Yousang Gwack Calcium signalling and epigenetics in T cells

Charles Drew University (2) Fall 2012

Satyesh Sinha Effect of M-CSF/GM-CSF ratio on macrophage polarization in Diabetic Nephropathy
Piwen Wang Protein targets towards an increased inhibition of prostate tumor growth in SCID mice by a combination of green tea and quercetin

LA-BioMed-Harbor UCLA (2) Fall 2012



Soo Jin Yang The role of the LytSR sense-response system in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides in Staphylococcus aureus
Michelina Iacovino HoxA3 and heart development
Kevin Bruhn Resiquimod as an Alternative Treatment for American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis
Tsui-Fen Chou Identification of biomarkers of p97 inhibition for anti-p97 cancer therapy
Christina C. L. Wang Influence of testosterone on non-alcholic fatty liver disease in men
Patricia Dickson Biomarkers for Mucopolysaccharidosis
Scott G. Filler Candida Invasion of Endothelium and Virulence

KL2 Translational Science

2012 KL2 Translational Science Scholars

McKinnell,_James.jpg James A. McKinnell, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine

LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA


Project title:
Using Research in Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus to Validate an Efficient System of Quantifying Antibiotic Utilization

Mentors:

Loren G. Miller, MD, MPH – LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA

Susan S. Huang, MD, MPH – UC Irvine

Martin F. Shapiro, MD, PhD – UCLA

Multidisciplinary Expertise:
Infectious Disease, Health Services Research, Clinical Trials, and Clinical Outcomes Research

Project Description:
Approximately 100,000 Americans die every year from infections acquired in hospitals. HAI due to Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. (VRE) are of particular concern. VRE HAI’s disproportionately affect the most immunocompromised hosts, such as organ transplant recipients, and the severely immunosuppressed. Each VRE bloodstream infection (VRE-BSI) is associated with $50,000 of additional healthcare costs and a 35% attributable mortality. The purpose of this investigation is to 1) evaluate the association between antibiotic use and VRE-BSI incidence, 2) investigate VRE-BSI outcomes using improved methodologies, and 3) validate an electronic source of patient-level antibiotic usage data that can be used for investigations of VRE-BSI and further research on other important pathogens.

Dr. McKinnell will work to develop a database to evaluate the association between antibiotic use, VRE-BSI incidence, and outcomes of patients with VRE-BSI from data derived from Ronald Reagan Medical Center. He will also lead efforts to conduct a retrospective chart review to define the predictors of treatment success among hospitalized patients with VRE-BSI and validate the antibiotic database.

Mary E. Sehl

Mary E. Sehl, MD, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine

Division of Hematology-Oncology, UCLA


Project title: Modeling of EMT/MET transitions in breast cancer stem cells

Mentors:

Kenneth Lange, Ph.D. - UCLA

Gay Crooks, M.B.B.S. - UCLA

Max Wicha, M.D. – University of Michigan

Multidisciplinary Expertise:
biomathematics, oncology, cancer stem cells

Project description:
Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer diagnosis in women, with the majority of deaths caused by distant recurrence.

Stem cell-targeted therapies offer new hope in eradicating breast cancer stem-like cells that lead to recurrence after standard therapies fail. Mathematical models have proven useful in studying the population dynamics of cancer stem cells under targeted therapy and are informative in assessing safety and duration of therapy. However, the complexities of the stem cell microenvironment limit the predictive ability of analytic models and suggest the necessity of more informed modeling strategies.

Stochastic simulation methods model rare events that are important in cancer modeling, such as extinction and mutation, and have the ability to address complex dynamics and incorporate feedback of reaction networks in systems biology.  We postulate a model in which breast cancer stem-like cells freely convert between an epithelial (proliferative) and mesenchymal (quiescent, invasive) state, through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the reverse process (MET). The mesenchymal state is identified by CD44, a marker of cell adhesion and invasive potential, while epithelial stem cells can be CD44 negative and express ALDH, a marker of mammary stem cells and predictor of poor clinical outcome (6). Cytokines such as IL-6 and TGF-beta, as well as intracellular signaling and miRNAs, may regulate the interconversion of breast cancer stem-like cells between EMT-like and MET-like states. 

We propose a combination of theoretical modeling with experimental validation to study the rates and regulators of EMT/MET transitions in breast cancer stem-like cells. We apply our model to predict alterations in stem cell populations and their regulatory pathways in response to niche-targeted therapy. Ultimately, predictions of therapeutic efficacy and safety could be validated in clinical trials and used to guide drug development and plan therapy duration. We envision that extinction models will provide a novel approach to therapeutic design.

David Shackelford David Shackelford, PhD

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UCLA

Project title: Development of novel therapeutic strategies to target LKB1/STK11 deficient non-small cell lung cancer

Mentors:

Steven M. Dubinett, MD – UCLA

Hong Wu, MD, PhD – UCLA

Multidisciplinary Expertise:
Translational cancer research, signal transduction, metabolism, lung carcinogenesis, genetically engineered mouse models of lung cancer, micro PET-CT imaging

Project Description:
My project focuses on identifying and testing novel therapies for the treatment of early stage LKB1-deficient lung tumors. The LKB1 tumor suppressor functions as a master regulator of cellular growth, metabolism and survival.  Importantly, the LKB1 gene is frequently mutated in ~35% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) however, the molecular mechanisms driving tumor growth following LKB1 mutations are poorly understood and to date there are no therapies that target LKB1-deficient lung cancer.  As more targeted therapeutics for NSCLC are needed, I explored use of biguanides, traditionally used to treat diabetes, as metabolic stress agents to target LKB1-deficient lung tumors.  At a cellular level, LKB1-deficient tumor cells are unable to respond to energy stress and selectively undergo increased apoptosis following treatment with metabolic stress agents such as biguanides. The selective sensitivity of LKB1-deficient tumors to metabolic stress presents an Achilles heel to exploit and opens a therapeutic window from which to target LKB1-deficient cells. Additionally, loss of the LKB1 gene results in elevated mTOR signaling that results in increased tumor growth and proliferation.  My project will investigate the use of biguanides (metformin or phenformin) in combination with targeted mTORC1 inhibitors (rapamycin or INK128) for the treatment of LKB1-deficient NSCLC.  I will perform preclinical studies using genetically engineered mouse models of lung cancer to assess the efficacy these novel drug combinations in vivo.  Using micro 18FDG-PET and bioluminescence imaging in combination with detailed immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis I will dissect the molecular signaling pathways driving tumor growth and survival in LKB1-deficient lung tumors. With this multifaceted approach I aim to uncover novel pathways that can be exploited therapeutically in LKB1-deficient tumors. My overarching goal is to identify new, clinically relevant therapeutic strategies to treat patients with NSCLC harboring LKB1 mutations.


2011 Translational Science Scholars

Amira K. Brown, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine
Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science
Project: Effects of varenicline on alcohol and nicotine consumption and changes in dopamine d2-like receptor availability in high-alcohol-preferring mice

Mentors:

Theodore Friedman, MD, PhD - Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science

Mark Mandelkern, MD, PhD - VA Greater Los Angeles Health System

Multidisciplinary Expertise:
Endocrinology, Medical Physics, Pharmacology, Psychology

Project Description:
Dopamine is a chemical in the brain with many important functions. This project aims to understand the role of the dopamine receptor system in concomitant alcohol and nicotine abuse and treatment.

The project specifically focuses on the d2 dopamine receptor, which is involved in reward-seeking behavior. Lower d2 dopamine receptors have been shown in animal models of addiction and substance abusers.

Positron emission tomography (PET) will be used to characterize the dopamine d2 receptor profile in the brains of high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) and low-alcohol-preferring (LAP) mice. We expect that HAP mice will have significantly lower dopamine d2 receptor availability in an area of the brain called the striatum when compared to LAP or normal, wild-type mice.

This study also will examine the effects of varenicline, a smoking-cessation drug, on dopamine d2 receptor availability, nicotine and alcohol consumption in HAP and LAP mice. HAP mice will increase their voluntary alcohol consumption following chronic nicotine exposure; that increase will be related to decreases in striatal d2 receptor availability. However, following varenilcine treatment, HAP mice exposed to chronic nicotine are expected to decrease their voluntary intake of alcohol; that decrease in alcohol intake will be related to increases in dopamine d2 receptor availability.

Results from this study will provide important scientific and clinical information regarding the role of the dopamine receptor system in the underlying mechanisms of comorbid alcohol and nicotine preference. Moreover, finding an effective pharmacotherapy for this addiction is crucial; as such, the project will determine whether changes in dopamine receptors are involved in the efficacy of varenicline treatment success.


Joshua J. Zaritsky, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor
Pediatrics Division of Pediatric Nephrology
Mattel Children's Hospital, UCLA
Project: Hepcidin and the anemia of chronic kidney disease

Mentors:

Isidro Salusky, MD - UCLA

Tomas Ganz, MD, PhD - UCLA

Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD - LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

Multidisciplinary Expertise:
Nephrology, Pediatrics

Project Description:
Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA)(drugs used to spur red blood cell production), are an important component of anemia therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). ESA hyporesponsiveness, however, occurs frequently and is often associated with iron deficiency and inflammation as well as poor outcomes. Given the urgent need to explore novel approaches that can allow ESA dose reduction as recently recommended by the FDA, it is crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms that link inflammation, iron balance and erythropoiesis in CKD. Hepcidin, a protein produced in the liver, is a key regulator of iron homeostasis. Preliminary data indicates that hepcidin accumulates in CKD, making it likely that hepcidin plays a major role in the anemia of CKD as well as ESA hyporesponsiveness.

This project aims to expand our knowledge of hepcidin biology in the setting of CKD. It will examine two hypotheses: (1) Does progressive loss of kidney function directly lead to increased hepcidin levels? and (2) Do these increased hepcidin levels contribute to iron restriction and anemia in experimental animals with CKD?

This project will provide crucial knowledge as to whether hepcidin contributes to the anemia of renal disease and ESA hyporesponsiveness and thus will help to optimize anemia treatment of CKD.


Gelareh Z. Gabayan, MD, MSHS

Assistant Professor
Medicine/Emergency Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine
UCLA VA Greater Los Angeles Health System
Project: Patterns and predictors of poor outcomes following emergency department discharge in older adults

Mentors:

Catherine A. Sarkisian, MD, MSPH - UCLA

Arthur Kellermann, MD, MPH - RAND

Jerome R. Hoffman, MD, MA - USC

Multidisciplinary Expertise:
Emergency Medicine, Geriatrics, Health Services Research

Project Description:
This project assesses Emergency Department (ED) quality and patient safety by evaluating the factors associated with poor outcomes following an ED visit. In collaboration with Kaiser Permanente Southern California and using a case-control study design, this study will identify the patterns and predictors of short-term mortality or an ICU admission following discharge from the ED in older adults. The ultimate goal of this project is to reduce the incidence of preventable poor outcomes following discharge from the ED through the implementation of feasible and practical Emergency Department systems-based interventions.

UCLA and the University of Minnesota Cross-Institutional Award

Project Title UM Scholar UCLA Scholar
Alzheimer's Disease Coordinated Care for Hispanic and Latino Seniors Josheph E. Gaugler Joshua Chodosh
HIE Use in Small- and Medium-Sized Primary Care Practices: Understanding & Eliminating the Disparity William Riley Hector Rodriguez
Correlation of Early Childhood Caries Risk and Obesity in Preschool Age Children Via Salivary Testing Robert Simon Jones Francisco J. Ramos-Gomez

Catalyst Award

UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) is inviting applications for Catalyst Grants. Catalyst Grants support team-building activities that advance translational science and promote collaborations across disciplines and CTSI institutions. Awards will range from $100 to $5,000, depending on the nature scope of the project.


Core Voucher

The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) provides the infrastructure to translate scientific discoveries into innovations that improve health in Los Angeles and the nation. To achieve its mission and advance translational research, the CTSI periodically awards vouchers to defray the cost of core services. Under this RFA, the CTSI will award vouchers worth up to $10,000 in core services to investigators at all CTSI partner institutions (UCLA Westwood, Cedars-Sinai, LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA, and Charles Drew University).

Eligibility

Principal Investigator

  • UCLA Westwood: All full-time faculty with appointments in any of the Professorial Series, as well as clinical instructors in the School of Medicine, are eligible to apply. Junior Investigators (within 5 years of their academic appointment) will receive priority consideration. More information regarding the Professorial Series may be obtained at: https://www.apo.ucla.edu/policies/the-call/professorial-series.

    Investigators with appointments in the Professional Research Series (defined at: https://www.apo.ucla.edu/policies/the-call/professional-research-series) may apply by one of two mechanisms. (1) Those participating in supervised research should apply under their lab mentor’s name as a Co-Investigator. (2) Those requesting support for projects that are independent of their lab mentor may be eligible to apply directly, but must first contact the CTSI Center for Translational Technologies (CTT) (eliclican@mednet.ucla.edu) no later than March 5, 2014, prior to submitting their application. Eligibility decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis within 1-2 days of contacting the CTT.

  • Cedars-Sinai: All Cedars-Sinai faculty are eligible to apply; junior faculty will receive priority consideration. For questions about eligibility, please contact Jerlyn Tolentino (jerlyn.tolentino@cshs.org).
  • LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA: All full-time investigators are eligible to apply; junior investigators will receive priority consideration. For questions, please contact Terry Doherty (tmdoherty@labiomed.org).
  • Charles Drew University (CDU): All CDU faculty are eligible to apply.

Each eligible Principal Investigator may submit one and only one application.

Co-Investigator (1 per application)

  • Non-faculty researchers (professional researchers, project scientists, research scientists, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students) are eligible to be listed as a Co-Investigator on a faculty member’s application. Please note that a faculty member may still only submit one application.

Previous voucher recipients may apply only if a different proposal is being submitted. Continuations/extensions of previously awarded proposals are not eligible.

Application Requirements and Processes

Apply online at http://voucher.ctsi.ucla.edu/.
All applications must be submitted through the online system. Please carefully follow all instructions on application.

Applicants must have a UCLA logon ID (previously known as BOL) to access the online application. One may be obtained at: https://www.bol.ucla.edu/help/faq/account.html. Applicants are encouraged to complete this process well in advance of the application deadline.

Investigators must be pursuing a project that could immediately benefit from access to the more than 65 cores located on the LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA, Cedars-Sinai, or UCLA Westwood campuses. A partial list of cores can be found at http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/research/pages/lab-research-facilities. For questions about cores not listed, please contact CTT.

Applicants must provide the following:

  • Project description demonstrating need for specific core(s) (maximum 2000 characters including white spaces, about 300 words)
  • Budget justification for the requested core(s) (maximum 500 characters including white spaces, about 80 words)
  • For previous voucher awardees, justification for any possible overlap between this proposal and previously awarded voucher (maximum 500 characters including white spaces, about 80 words)
  • Current biosketch(es) that includes a list of current and pending funding in PDF format - please merge Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator biosketches into one PDF file, if applicable

Applicants must adhere to the strict character limit and biosketch file format to ensure a successful submission.

Proposals will be reviewed and ranked based on:

  1. Translatability - Does the proposal directly address a significant problem in human health? Will the project provide valuable information and likely advance towards clinical utilization in the near future? Will the knowledge gained from this proposal transform clinical practice?
  2. Innovation - Does the project address the health problem with a novel, unique approach? This component is given the highest priority.
  3. Core Utilization - Is the project feasible? Can the requested core services be completed within the next 6 months? Does the experimental approach optimally utilize the capabilities of the core(s)?

Applicants are highly encouraged to discuss their proposals and budget with the relevant cores and core directors prior to submitting the application.

An acknowledgment e-mail will be automatically sent once an application is successfully submitted.

Additional Requirements

Awarded investigators will be required to provide their NIH eRA Commons ID, their field of specialization, and their IRB, IACUC, and/or ESCRO numbers if applicable. Proposals must be ready to begin using core services as soon as vouchers are awarded - all IRB, IACUC, and ESCRO approvals must be in place at the time of award.

Voucher awards must be expended within 10 months of award notification. Recipients must disclose the UCLA CTSI grant number UL1TR000124 as a funding source to the IRB and/or ARC as applicable, and must cite the grant in all publications that result from this CTSI-supported research. In addition, voucher recipients must report the following information to the UCLA CTSI by November 30 each year:

  1. All publications that resulted from CTSI-supported research with PubMed ID
  2. All PHS and non-PHS federal support that contributed to the CTSI-supported research

Deadlines

Completed applications must be submitted by 11:59 pm Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Awards are expected to be announced by the end of April, 2014.

Contact Information

For questions regarding the content and scope of this RFA, faculty eligibility or for technical difficulties concerning the online application process, please contact:

  • UCLA Westwood and Charles Drew University:
    Elvira Liclican, Technology and Science Officer, UCLA CTSI Center for Translational Technologies
    E-mail: eliclican@mednet.ucla.edu
    Office: (310) 825-3518
  • Cedars-Sinai:
    Jerlyn Tolentino, Research Facilitator
    E-mail: jerlyn.tolentino@cshs.org
    Office: (310) 423-2475
  • LA Biomed at Harbor-UCLA:
    Terence M. Doherty, Director of Interdisciplinary Research
    E-mail: tmdoherty@labiomed.org
    Office: (310) 781-3633

UCLA CTSI TL1 Summer Fellowship for Health Professional Students

The UCLA CTSI TL1 Summer Fellowship is for health professional students (medical, nursing and dental) during their training. The program will provide each individual with early exposure to the practice of interdisciplinary, community-partnered translational or health services research in urban underserved communities. Each student in the program will attend a weekly seminar (for 8 weeks) where they will hear about topics such as introduction to health disparities research, access to care, quality of care, community-partnered research methods, ethics of conducting community-oriented research, study design, measurement of outcomes in communities, introduction to comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness analyses. Each student in this program will be paired with a faculty mentor who conducts either clinical or community-partnered or health services research and will be expected to work on a project with the mentor. Findings from this work will be presented in a CTSI-sponsored poster session and possibly co-authorship for the student in a peer reviewed publication resulting from the project.  Mentorship activities will provide the trainee with first-hand experience working on disparities-related research projects.  There are 12 training slots available per summer.

Program Dates: June 9 to August 1, 2014. (Josiah Brown Poster Fair will be on July 31st.)

Potential Mentors: Applicants are strongly encouraged to reach out to faculty as soon as possible to obtain their agreement to serve as his/her CTSI TL1 summer mentor, to assist with the application, as well as to design the project.  Applicants can also apply with other faculty mentors not on the list.  

Application Deadline: Monday, March 31, 2014 by 5PM.

Funding
  • Predoctoral stipends are uniformly set for all trainees by the National Institute of Health. Currently, the summer stipend is $3,672 for the 2-month summer program trainees.  Stipend policies are generated and implemented uniformly by the NIH.
  • TL1 Summer Trainees are eligible to receive up to $700 for research project expenses.

To Apply:  Application guidelines, eligibility criteria and submission instructions are available here.


Questions about the UCLA CTSI TL1 Summer Fellowship can be directed to Arturo Gongora at AGongora@mednet.ucla.edu

KL2 Translational Science Award

The UCLA CTSI KL2 Translational Science Award supports highly qualified junior faculty from one of the four partnered institutions (UCLA, Cedars-Sinai, Charles R. Drew University, and LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA) to conduct mentored, interdisciplinary, patient-oriented research . The program is specifically designed to meet an important goal of the UCLA CTSI: To provide the next generation of clinicians with the training they need to conduct research across engineering, physics and other disciplines to improve health.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Possess a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, Pharm D, DDS) and be a junior faculty member at one of the four UCLA CTSI partnered institutions in any series at or above the clinical instructor level as of July 1, 2014.
  • U.S. citizen or permanent resident at time of application,
  • Commit 75% of professional effort to translational research (surgeons and some other specialists with large clinical burdens may request a lower level of effort, but in no case lower than 50%). If you would like to request a lower level of effort, please contact KL2@ctsi.ucla.edu so a formal request can be submitted to the NIH.
  • Not be or have been a principal investigator on an NIH R01, or project leader on a subproject of a Program Project (P01), Center (P50, P60, U54), mentored career development grant (K23, K08, K01, etc.), or equivalent non-PHS peer reviewed research grant that is over $100,000 in direct costs per year. May have had support on a non-federal grant, a NRSA grant (F or T) or have been PI of an NIH small grant (R03 or R21). (Note: Candidates may have had previous support on a K-12 award, but the CTSI KL2 cannot extend total K support beyond five years.
  • The trans-NIH policy stipulates that K12/KL2 candidates may not apply or have a pending application for a similar mentored K award (i.e. K08, K23) simultaneously.

Letter of Intent & Application Information

Letters of Intent will be accepted through 8:00AM PST on February 3th, 2014. Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit a Letter of Intent to help the CTSI identify the best reviewers and enhance the review process of your application.

Full applications are due by 8:00 AM PST on February 24th, 2014.

Application guidelines and submission instructions are available at:

http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/education/pages/application.

To be considered, the full application packet must include:

  • Application (six pages maximum) from the candidate indicating her or his CTSI KL2 Program research project (including specific aims) and training goals, how these goals align with the CTSI mission, his or her future career plans, and how this award will be career-advancing in clinical and translational research. Application should follow structure and format for NIH K Award submission. See KL2 Additional Instructions.
  • Primary mentor’s letter of support (up to two pages) from the candidate's potential Primary Mentor detailing the candidate's capabilities, accomplishments, and commitment to developing an academic career in translational research; a preliminary research training plan, including area of focus and specific projects; potential associate mentors to enhance training expertise; additional plans for the candidate's professional development; departmental support for the candidate's future academic career development.
  • Institutional letter of support (up to two pages) from the candidate’s division chief or department chair to commit protected research time throughout the duration of the KL2 award.
  • Additional letters of support from co-mentors and/or collaborators (two letters maximum, up to two pages each)
  • CV of potential CTSI KL2 candidate.
  • NIH-formatted Other Support Pages of the candidate with current, past and pending grants. Please see the NIH policy concerning concurrent support from a K award and a research grant.
  • Primary Mentor’s NIH-formatted biosketch
  • NIH-formatted detailed budget and budget justification for each year of the three years of support. Please use Form Page 4 for the detailed budget for each year and Continuation Page Format for the budget justifications.
  • Data and safety monitoring plan (when applicable)
  • References/bibliography and appendix (optional). The appendix may include letters of support for use of equipment or data.

Three UCLA CTSI KL2 Translational Science trainees will receive salary support up to $75,000 a year each for 75% effort to pursue interdisciplinary, mentored research with training. The award, which is renewable for up to three years, provides benefits, up to $25,000 for research, and funds for tuition, travel and statistical support per year. Complete details are available at: http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/education/pages/award.

Questions about the UCLA CTSI KL2 Translational Science Award can be directed to Lisa Chan at KL2@ctsi.ucla.edu.

UCLA CTSI R Bridge Grant

The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) is pleased to announce the R Bridge Grant for highly qualified, new investigators who conduct interdisciplinary and translational research. Eligible new investigators at one of the four UCLA CTSI institutions (CDU, Cedars-Sinai, Harbor-UCLA, and UCLA Westwood) are invited to apply for a bridging grant for up to $75,000 from the CTSI over 12 months to support research and career development across the spectrum of translational science. This award requires an equal amount of matching funds from their home institution(s)/departments(s). For example, if an investigator is requesting $75K from the CTSI, his/her home department must also contribute $75K for a total award of $150K.

These awards are specifically intended to help new investigators make the critical transition to independent NIH R01 funding, allowing those who have received competitive scores on their first R01 proposals to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to remain scientifically productive and strengthen their proposals for resubmission.

Eligible applicants must:

  • Be the Principal Investigator on a recently submitted and reviewed R01 application that was an original submission (A0) or an amended proposal in response to a first review (A1) and that was ranked within the top 50th percentile but was not funded.
  • Meet the NIH definition of a New Investigator
  • Plan to resubmit the R01 as an amended application in response to the review within the next 12 months
  • Commit a minimum of 75% of full-time professional effort to conduct research

The Award

CTSI R Bridge Grant recipients will receive up to 12 months of funding, which may include salary, fringe benefits and research-related support. Recipients may receive funding until receipt of an NIH R01 grant up to a maximum of 12 months.

Please note that this program is limited to New Investigator R01 submissions that are likely to be funded during the next year. Applications to other funding mechanisms are not eligible.

Application Packet

Submission Website: https://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/Awards/rbridge-grant/. If you get an error message by clicking on the link, please copy and paste the URL directly into your browser.

Please submit your online application packet by 8AM Monday, March 3, 2014 to include the following required items:

  1. A copy of the submitted R01 application materials on the Standard Forms SF424 (R&R).
  2. NIH Study Section critique, priority score, and percentile score received.
  3. Current NIH Biosketch
  4. Responses addressing the concerns expressed in the NIH critique
  5. Justification of the need for bridge funding to initiate/continue the research project (1 page maximum)
  6. Detailed R Bridge budget (using Form Page 4) and budget justification.
  7. Letter of support from department chair or division chief to commit equal matching funds.

For questions, please contact Lisa Chan at lchan@mednet.ucla.edu.

R Bridge Grant Start Date: May 1, 2014

CTSI/CDI Children's Health Team Science Award

Letter of Intent Due Date
November 15, 2013 (Finalists for full applications notified by December 15, 2013)

Application Due Date
March 1, 2014, 5 pm PST Funding Period July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

Funding Amount
Up to 200,000/year for one year to support salary, benefits and research supplies

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the UCLA Children’s Discovery and Innovation Institute (CDI) are pleased to announce the CTSI/CDI Children’s Health Team Science Award for research teams from UCLA and CTSI partner institutions (Cedars-Sinai, Charles Drew University, LA-Biomed) and CTSI-affiliated institutions (RAND, Olive View UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System) to conduct novel, multidisciplinary, team-oriented and high-impact research in Children’s Health. The team-oriented approach is essential to the feasibility and potential success of the proposal. Applicants are encouraged to follow the same guidelines and criteria as NIH-PPG (Program Project Grant) proposals. Teams are expected to generate data that will lead not only to academic products but also to the submission of high-quality R01-level or P01-level proposals to public agencies or private foundations.

The CTSI/CDI Children’s Health Team Science Award will support four initial research themes, intended to be broadly and inclusively interpreted, to help investigators develop forums for this multidisciplinary work. Each Team should have a central focus on a related set of clinical disorders related to these research themes.

  1. Brain, Behavior, and Development
  2. Cancer and Regeneration
  3. Infection, Inflammation, and Immunity
  4. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Growth

Specific Requirements:

  • The research team must be led by a Principal Investigator (PI) who is full-time faculty at UCLA or CTSI partner or affiliate institution with a proven track record of high-impact research and productivity and leadership in the research theme.
  • Principal Investigators and Co-Investigators must have a strong track record of collaboration among the participating team members.
  • Proposal must not overlap with current NIH-funded program projects in which team members participate.

Full application:

  • Standard NIH-style research plan (including specific aims, significance, innovation, and approach). Applications should be no longer than 10 pages single-spaced, Arial font 11.
  • Standard NIH-style biosketches and other support.
  • Standard NIH-style budget and budget justifications. There is no indirect cost rate – the entire budget may be allocated for direct costs.

Additional Requirements:

  • End of project reports will be required; template will be provided. Grantees are expected to present research findings at CTSI/CDI sponsored events.
  • Successful applicants must provide their NIH Commons ID and their IRB and/or IACUC numbers, if applicable, before funds are released.
  • Awardees must include an acknowledgement of support to read “Research was supported by the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NIH) and the UCLA Children’s Discovery and Innovation Institute (logos will be provided).


Any questions related to this RFA, please address to:
Dion Baybridge
(310) 794-7374
DBaybridge@mednet.ucla.edu

Junior Faculty Mentored-Research Award

Junior Faculty Mentored-Research Awards are available for junior faculty in any series within their first three years of appointment to support mentored training in translational research in all areas of investigation. Grants of a maximum of $30,000 will be awarded for a one-year period. Funding from this program cannot be used to support the PI’s salary. Applications will be accepted from MD or PhD junior faculty in any series at UCLA CTSI partnered and affiliated institutions, within their first 3 years of appointment.

The criteria for the selection include quality of the scientific proposal, the candidate’s potential for an independent translational research career, potential translational impact of the research and relevance to the overall translational research mission of the UCLA CTSI. Awarded Scholars will participate in CTSI research education and career development opportunities. Scholars will complete an annual progress report as part of their award requirements.

Business of Science Proof-of-Concept Awards

CTSI supports the Business of Science Center Venture Team Program, which pairs faculty inventors with graduate students from such areas as law, business, medicine, life science, physical science and engineering. The teams compete for proof-of-concept awards, which are partly funded by CTSI. More information about the Venture Team Program can be found here.

UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME & CTSI Pilot-Study Awards

DEADLINE EXTENDED!!!

UCLA/CDU Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research
Center for Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR/CHIME) and
UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI)

http://www.chime.ucla.edu/rfa.htm

Applications being accepted for three (3) one-year
NIH/NIA-funded Pilot-Study Awards up to $40,000 each, with a study period
from 07/01/2014 to 06/30/2015

Who Should Apply: Applications are being accepted from junior-level, minority faculty researchers who currently have or will have a faculty appointment effective 07/01/2014 at UCLA or another academic institution in the greater Los Angeles area who are interested in conducting pilot research or minority elderly populations.

Funding Amount Available: Three (3) one-year pilot-study awards are available of up to a total of $40,000 each: $20,000 funded from the UCLA / Charles Drew University (CDU) Resource Center for Minority Aging Research / Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR/CHIME) (NIH/NIA Grant #P30-AG021684) and $20,000 funded from the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI (NIH/NCATS Grant #UL1TR000124).

Focus of Pilot-Study Projects: Support will be given to pilot-study research projects that are consistent with the goal of the UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME, which is to provide a research infrastructure of training and mentoring minority, junior- and mid-level faculty who can advance their academic careers by conducting pilot-study projects that contribute to the reduction of health disparities affecting minority elders. Applications of interest are those in which the applicant proposes to conduct primary data collection and/or secondary data analysis with the intent of reducing health disparities affecting minority elder populations, particularly African-American and Latino elders. Typically, pilot-study projects that are selected involve developing the evidence base or providing preliminary data for intervention trials that aim to address disparities in the health care of minority elderly populations. Ideally, these pilot-study projects demonstrate effective inter-institutional and/or academic-community partnerships. We do not fund projects focused on basic science or clinical research (a branch of medical science that determines the safety and effectiveness of medications, devices, diagnostic products and treatment regimens intended for human use).

Application Submission Timeline and Selection Process: By 12pm noon Friday, March 21, 2014, applicants must complete and submit the following required documents:

  1. Complete the required on-line application form on the RCMAR/CHIME website:
    http://www.chime.ucla.edu/rfa.htm
  2. Email the following required documents as Microsoft Word attachments to Carole A. Nagy at rcmarchime@ucla.edu
    1. A two-page Synopsis of Pilot Study, double-spaced using Arial font 11-point typeface, with one-inch margins, on 8.5"x11" -size page, that must include:
      1. Specific aims of pilot-study project;
      2. Description of proposed study including brief description of study design, and data to be collected or used in the pilot-study project;
      3. A specific statement about how the planned pilot-study project is related to the RCMAR goal of supporting junior-level minority faculty who can advance their academic careers by conducting pilot-study research that contributes to the reduction of health disparities affecting minority elders;
      4. A timeline that documents the feasibility of completing the pilot-study project in one year;
      5. A specific statement about how this pilot-study project will inform the applicant’s future research and how it will lead to larger NIH or foundation funding;
      6. A description of the proposed pilot-study project investigators and their roles on the project; and
      7. Proposed mentor(s) and a statement about their involvement and the role they will play in this pilot-study project.
    2. Applicant's CV.
    3. Proposed Mentor's (s') CV or NIH Biosketch
    4. (Optional) Institutional Letter of Support: If you do not currently have a junior-level faculty appointment effective 07/01/2014, you must submit an institutional letter of support from either your department chair or division chief confirming the title and effective date of your appointment and confirmation of you having adequate "protected time" during the 2014-15 fiscal year to be able to conduct your proposed pilot-study project.

Criteria for Selection of Synopses of Pilot Study: Applicants will be selected to submit a full proposal based on:

  1. Completing the required on-line application form and emailing the required documents listed above in Section 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D.
  2. Meeting junior-level faculty appointment and minority status requirements;
  3. Academic and research credentials to conduct proposed research;
  4. Qualifications of mentor(s) to assist with career development and/or conducting proposed pilot-study project;
  5. Quality of proposed pilot-study project and feasibility of it being completed within one year;
  6. Relatedness of proposed pilot-study project to the RCMAR/CHIME goal of supporting research that contributes to the reduction of health disparities affecting minority elder populations; and
  7. Likelihood that proposed pilot-study project will lead to publication of at least one (1) first-authored, peer-reviewed manuscript plus subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health, particularly the National Institute on Aging.

Timeline for Processing of Synopses:

  1. By 12pm noon Friday, March 21, 2014, applicants must submit an on-line application on the RCMAR/CHIME website – http://www.chime.ucla.edu/rfa.htm – and must email the above-listed required documents to Carole A. Nagy, Project Director, at rcmarchime@ucla.edu
  2. By approximately April 4, 2014, selected candidates will be notified if they have been selected to prepare full proposals,
  3. By approximately May 2, 2014, selected candidates must submit full proposals including a six-page research plan and detailed budget as well as other supporting documents to Carole A. Nagy at rcmarchime@ucla.edu, Those candidates whose proposals are selected for funding will be notified by May 16th, 2014. These proposals selected for funding will be forwarded to the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA), which funds the UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME, which must give final approval of the proposals before the funded-award can be dispersed after July 1, 2014.

About UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME & the UCLA CTSI
The UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME and the UCLA CTSI are based in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. RCMAR/CHIME is currently in its 12th year of funding under NIH/NIA Grant Number 2P30AG021684, and the UCLA CTSI is currently in its 4th year of funding under NIH/NCRR/NCATS Grant Number UL1TR000124.

For information about UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME, go to: http://www.chime.ucla.edu
For information about the national RCMARs, go to: http://www.rcmar.ucla.edu
For information about the UCLA CTSI, go to: http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu

2014 Awards in Translational Neurodegeneration/Neural Repair Research

Brain Research Institute, Integrative Center for Neural Repair & the Clinical and Translational Science Institute Research Awards

General Information:
RFA for Proposals in Translational Neurodegeneration and Neural Repair The UCLA BRI and Integrated Center for Neural Repair (ICNR) in collaboration with the CTSI is pleased to announce an RFA for Awards for Translational Neurodegeneration/Neural Repair Research.

The awards are intended to catalyze extramural funding for innovative, collaborative and translational neuroscience within and among CTSI partner and affiliate institutions.

Proposal Submission Date & Time:
Proposal must be submitted by the close of business on February 28th, 2014 by 5:00 pm PST.

Project Period Dates:
The award period will be for one year. Funding will start on July 1, 2014 upon approval from BRI and CTSI, and after all required documents are received. Prior to transfer of funds, appropriate IRB/ARC approvals must be in place.

How to Apply:
Online via CTSI website - click here to go to online application.

Grant Description:
UCLA Brain Research Institute (BRI) donors have given $100,000 specifically in support of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's research. The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) has agreed to co‐sponsor with the BRI an RFA with matching funds of an additional $100,000 allowing increased scope of proposals to include translational research in all aspects of Neurodegeneration or Neural Repair. Evaluation of proposals will be conducted by the Integrative Center for Neural Repair (ICNR) and the Committee overseeing the new DGSoM Regeneration/Degeneration and Repair theme. This RFA will fund up to 4 projects (maximum $50,000 per project) that demonstrate collaborative and innovative research, and that will increase competiveness for NIH awards for translational research or clinical trials. Two of the four projects will be funded within the Alzheimer’s and/or Parkinson’s fields. The remaining two projects can be within basic science or clinical study of neurodegeneration or neural repair. Priority will be given to projects from productive faculty facing financial obstacles as a result of the current funding climate.

Who May Apply:
Applications must be from a faculty member in a CTSI partner institution or a CTSI‐affiliated institution: UCLA, Cedars‐Sinai, Charles Drew University, LA‐Biomed, Olive View UCLA Medical Center, RAND, Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System.

If there are questions concerning responsivity to the RFA of a potential application please contact Marie-Francoise Chesselet at mchesselet@mednet.ucla.edu.

Specific Requirements:

  • The research must be led by a principal investigator (PI) who is full‐time faculty at a CTSI partner or affiliate institution (UCLA applications must be from a PI who is a member of the Academic Senate), with a proven track record of high‐impact research.
  • Applications are welcome both from investigators refocusing their research to studies of neurodegeneration or neural repair as well as those established in this area of neuroscience.
  • The research project should aim to be translational, collaborative, multidisciplinary and innovative.
  • The proposal should not overlap with any current NIH‐funded projects.
  • Funding should not be used for PI salary support.

Selection Criteria:
Impact: The proposal should have substantial impact to advance our current understanding and potential treatments of a neurodegenerative disease or neural repair process.
Novelty: The novelty of the proposal will be evaluated.
Collaborative and Multidisciplinary: Projects that are multidisciplinary and collaborative will be a high priority.
Feasibility and Productivity: Preliminary results and track record will be considered in relation to current funding.

Submission Guidelines:
Please refer to example NIH forms and their guidelines, use standard NIH form page/formats, and use NIH font/format requirements when completing the following documents. All character counts referenced below include spaces.

  1. An abstract research description in lay language, limited to 600 characters.
  2. One page Specific Aims, limited to 2,000 characters.
  3. No more than a 3 page Research Proposal including Significance, Innovation, Preliminary Data and Experimental Plan.
  4. NIH‐formatted Biosketch with all other financial support listed (4‐page limit with maximal of 15 representative publications) for PI and all key personnel.
  5. Plans for supporting the project beyond the grant period, limited to 2,000 characters.
  6. NIH form page 4 budget page/s, and a detailed budget justification for supply/other direct costs, and support of all personnel. No indirect costs are allowed.

CTSI Specific Requirements:

  1. The continued funding of the CTSI grants is dependent on the program's success. For this reason, it is important that any publications (journal articles, websites, papers, testimonials, etc.) resulting in whole or in part from this project should acknowledge support from both by including the following statement: "This project received support from both the NIH/NCATS UCLA CTSI Grant Number UL1TR000124" and the BRI.
  2. Please notify the CTSI and BRI of any subsequent extramural grant support obtained that is relevant to this grant funding.
  3. Prior to transfer of these funds, appropriate IRB/ARC approvals must be in place. In accordance with NIH policy, please amend your relevant IRB and/or ARC protocol to disclose funding support from the UCLA CTSI Grant number UL1TR00124.
  4. Please submit copies of your IRB, and/or ARC approval to Emily Sondergaard (ESondergaard@mednet.ucla.edu).
  5. The applicants must specify the exact extramural funding mechanism being targeted and application deadline (e.g., NHLBI P01 for June 1, 2014).
  6. Applicants must identify specific CTSI resources to be utilized and explain how the proposed research is translational.
  7. Progress reports and end‐of‐project reports will be required; templates will be provided. Presentations of posters at BRI and CTSI‐sponsored meetings are encouraged.

Questions:
Please send questions related to this RFA, to Ms. Terry Novorr (tnovorr@mednet.ucla.edu).
UCLA Brain Research Institute (BRI)
695 Charles E. Young Drive South #1506
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 825-5062 (Phone) (310) 206-5855 (Fax)

CURE Pilot and Feasibility

The CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center (CURE: DDRC) and the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) invite applications (new or second year renewal) for the 2013-2014 academic year. Funding will be available for high quality research in the biology, function and diseases of the digestive system, which is of relevance to the overall CURE Research Program, with special emphasis on receptor and signal transduction mechanisms, brain-gut interactions, gastrointestinal and pancreatic physiology and inflammation, and mechanisms underlying diseases of the digestive system. Proposed projects should lead to the submission of a NIH grant (e.g. K01, K08, R21, R01), VA Career Development or Merit Review Application or related agency research support. Awardees will be granted up to $40,000.

ELIGIBILITY:

  1. New investigators without current or past NIH or related agency research support (including career developmental awards) as principal investigators, who are seeking to establish their own independent research program.
  2. Established investigators with other research support, who have not been involved in research of the digestive system and who want to enter this field of research.
  3. Established investigators with other support for gastrointestinal research, who want to pursue a new research direction in the field of gastroenterology, which represents a significant departure from their funded research.

Highly innovative proposals are encouraged. Category 1 is given preference.

AWARD TERMS:

  1. Applicants must hold a Ph.D., M.D. or equivalent degree and have at least 2 years of postgraduate research experience.
  2. Trainees who are recipient of an NRSA individual award (F32) or are supported by an institutional training grant (T32) are eligible in their last year of training.
  3. Applicants must have a UCLA appointment (post-doc or beyond) by the time of the award.
  4. New investigators without independent support need to provide documentation of support of a UCLA or VA faculty sponsor.
  5. An investigator is eligible only once for PFS support with the exception of new investigators (category 1) whose previous PFS has resulted in independent funding thus applying as category 3.
  6. Applicants are required to use at least one Center core in addition to the Administrative Core (see website for list of Cores and services at http://www.cure.med.ucla.edu) and perform research at CURE (VA) and/or UCLA.
  7. Applications establishing collaborative interactions within the Center are encouraged.
  8. CTSI Reporting Requirements will be distributed at the time of the award notification.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

LETTER of INTENT:

A one-page letter of intent with the applicant’s NIH-style biosketch should be submitted by October 21, 2013 as an e-mail attachment (all in one document) to the program coordinator, Jacqueline Ismen. The letter of intent should include 1) the category for which the applicant wishes to apply, rank and department of the applicant, 2) the title, hypothesis and a paragraph describing the salient features of the project, 3) which core(s) of the CURE: DDRC will be used, and 4) the title of the mentor’s funded research, if the applicant is a junior investigator without independent funding, or of other funded projects, if the applicant is a senior investigator with independent funding, and how the proposed project will differ from the funded projects. Applicants will be notified of their eligibility to submit a full application.

FULL APPLICATION DEADLINE: December 16, 2013; Starting Date: March 1, 2014

For questions, please contact the Program Coordinator, Jacqueline Ismen at JIsmen@mednet.ucla.edu or Dr. Catia Sternini, Program Director, at csternin@ucla.edu

Center for Autism Research and Treatment (CART) Pilot Awards

APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 25, 2013 (Monday 5 pm)
FUNDING AMOUNT: $25,000 per project (direct costs)
BUDGET PERIOD: June 1, 2013 – May 31, 2014


The UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment (CART) invites applications for grants to fund pilot and/or feasibility studies for biomedical, epidemiological or behavioral research. This funding is made available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Autism Centers of Excellence (ACE) program which funds the UCLA CART, with Semel Institute departmental “Autism Initiative” funds to CART, and by collaborative funding from the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). The UCLA CART is an ACE Center, and also leads two ACE Networks, as funded by NIH as part of a nationwide set of research programs. The UCLA center’s activities are wide-ranging and include the integration of clinical, imaging, genetic, and basic science research to create a synergistic milieu that maximizes the productivity of the participants and attracts other investigators to the field of autism.

PURPOSE: The purpose of these awards is to foster interactions and interdisciplinary research projects in the basic and clinical areas of autism. Preference will be given to projects that are likely to lead to successful future funding (by R01-type awards, etc). Proposals addressing the mechanism and treatment of autism are encouraged. Projects can also build upon the UCLA CART’s mission and current research activities; descriptions of CART’s mission and research, including the previously funded pilot grants, and this announcement are available at our website www.autism.ucla.edu.

ELIGIBILITY: Funds are available to the UCLA academic community including new investigators, investigators from other fields willing to bring their research expertise to autism studies, and for investigators whose proposed research would constitute feasibility testing. Funds are not intended to supplement ongoing supported research of an established investigator. Postdoctoral fellows are eligible only if they have a UCLA appointment by June 1, 2013 and provide documentation of support of a faculty sponsor (who must serve as the Co-PI on the grant application), confirmed space allocation and a UCLA appointment, each through the entire award period.

AWARD TERMS: These pilot project awards are for one-year only and are limited to $25,000 (direct costs) per project. Funds will not be awarded for equipment costs or for salary or benefits for the principal investigator, postdoctoral fellow or any study personnel who hold an academic appointment. An investigator is eligible only once for the pilot support unless the additional proposed study constitutes a substantial departure from the previous research. All applications involving humans or animals must have IRB or ARC approval at UCLA or an UCLA-affiliated institute before the funds will be released. The funding period for 2013 awards is June 1, 2013 – May 31, 2014.

APPLICATION GUIDELINES: The proposals must present a testable hypothesis, clearly delineate the question(s) being asked, detail the procedures to be followed and discuss how the data will be analyzed. Specifically, the proposals may be up to 5 pages and must include: Abstract (250 words or less), Specific Aims, Background, Preliminary Studies, Experimental Design and Methods, and Significance. In addition, the literature references should be attached along with the following NIH (PHS 398) standard forms: the investigator’s 2-page biographical sketch, budget with detailed justification, and other outside funding support. If funded, the investigator also will need to provide a summary of the project in lay language and be willing to present the findings at CART & CTSI lectures and meetings.

Please submit 3 hardcopies (and email the complete application as one PDF) of your application on or before March 25, 2013 (Monday, by 5 pm) to CART’s Director of Operations & Outreach:

Candace J. Wilkinson, Ph.D., Semel/NPI Institute, Room 68-237; 760 Westwood Plaza; Los Angeles, CA 90024. If you have questions, you may contact Dr. Wilkinson at 310.825.9041 or e-mail: cwilkinson@mednet.ucla.edu

Full CART announcement can also be found here.

Team Science - Neuroscience

Submission: Online CTSI website at http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/Awards/TSATansNeuro/tsa-neuro-view

Date & Time: Proposal should be submitted by 5:00 pm PST on April 1, 2013.

Grant Description: The Neuroscience/CTSI community is accepting applications for Team Science Award in Translational Neuroscience from research teams at CTSI partner and affiliate institutions to conduct multidisciplinary, team-oriented and high-impact research in the area of neuroscience. Each research team will receive up to $100,000 from CTSI to be matched by an equal amount in matching funds shared by the UCLA Brain Research Institute, the Departments of Neurobiology, Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychology, and the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. The award provides maximum support of up to $200K for one year for salary support, benefits and research supplies. We intend to fund 1-2 proposals.

Specific Information:
Team Science Award in Translational Neurosciences
The Neuroscience Community in collaboration with the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute is pleased to announce the UCLA Neuroscience/CTSI Team Science Award in Translational Neurosciences for research teams from CTSI partner institutions (UCLA, Cedars-Sinai, Charles Drew University, LA-Biomed) and CTSI-affiliated institutions (RAND, Olive View UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System) to conduct novel, multidisciplinary, team-oriented and high-impact research in the area of neuroscience. The Team Science Award in Translational Neurosciences is intended to catalyze team science among CTSI partner and affiliate institutions to plan for submission of large extramural grants. Neuroscience related disorders and diseases represent a major challenge in health care with limited therapeutic options. This initiative is specifically designed to meet an important goal of the UCLA CTSI: To support emerging, high-impact, multidisciplinary research programs that aim to tackle the multi-factorial complexity in the mechanisms and manifestations of the diseases, and to promote accelerated translation between basic science research and clinical practice.

Who May Apply:
The Neuroscience/CTSI Team Science Award seeks to fund new research teams of established investigators utilizing innovative, shared research approaches, tools, models and concepts to bring a new paradigm to our current understanding and to have a transformative impact in the field.

Specific Requirements:

  • The research team must have multiple projects that revolve around a specific area of translational neuroscience and use complimentary and synergistic approaches. The team-oriented approach is essential to the feasibility and potential success of the proposal.
  • Research teams must be led by a principal investigator (PI) who is full-time faculty at a CTSI partner or affiliate institution with a proven track record of high-impact research and productivity and leadership in the research area.
  • Each research project must be led by a project leader who is a full-time faculty at one of the CTSI partner or affiliate institutions and has recognized expertise to lead the proposed project.
  • The proposal should not overlap with any current NIH-funded program projects or center grants in which team members participate.

Selection Criteria:

  • Significance: The proposal should have substantial impact to advance our current understanding of a brain disorder or disease and to translate the new knowledge into more effective and personalized therapies.
  • Innovation: The novelty of the proposal will be evaluated at conceptual, methodological and organizational   levels. Newly established collaborative efforts will be a priority for this funding source.
  • Teamwork: The proposal should foster stronger interaction among existing collaborations and create new opportunities for additional collaborations to enhance synergy. Projects that cross CTSI partner affiliate institutions are preferred but not required.
  • Feasibility: Strong preliminary results and track record of the expertise among team members.
  • Productivity: Record of high-impact publications among team members.

Submission Guidelines: (must use standard NIH page setup and font requirements)

  • An abstract of maximal 600 character limit research description in Lay language
  • One page of Specific Aims limited to 3,000 characters
  • No more than FIVE pages of Research Proposal including Significance, Innovation, Preliminary Data and Experimental Plan.
  • Program Development. One-page describing team organization, synergy and program development.
  • Plans for supporting the project beyond the grant period limited to 3,000 characters.
  • NIH-formatted biosketches (4-page limit with maximal of 15 representative publications) for the principal investigator, project leaders and key personnel.
  • A consolidated resource page stating major infrastructure and institutional support specifically for the proposal.
  • Review will be conducted by a committee charged by the Neuroscience Planning Committee. This includes initial distribution to experts for peer review and evaluation with scoring on a scale from 1 to 10. Please note that written critiques cannot be provided as CTSI guarantees all Faculty members that their comments and scores are confidential

Additional Requirements:
The applicants must specify the exact extramural funding mechanism being targeted and application deadline (e.g., NHLBI P01 for June 1, 2013). Applicants must identify specific CTSI resources to be utilized and explain how the proposed research is translational. Progress reports and end-of-project reports will be required; templates will be provided. Presentations of posters at BRI and CTSI-sponsored meetings are encouraged. Successful applicant Co-PIs must provide their field of specialization and their NIH Commons ID.

CTSI Specific Requirements:
Prior to transfer of these funds, appropriate IRB/ARC approvals must be in place. In accordance with NIH policy, please amend your relevant IRB and/or ARC protocol to disclose funding support from the UCLA CTSI Grant number UL1TR00124; please submit copies of your IRB, and/or ARC approval to Dion Baybridge, (catalyst@ctsi.ucla.edu).
The continued funding of the CTSI grants is dependent on the program’s success. For this reason, it is important that any publications (journal articles, websites, papers, testimonials, etc.) resulting in whole or in part from this project should acknowledge support from both by including the following statement: “This project received support from both the NIH/NCATS UCLA CTSI Grant Number UL1TR000124”. Please notify the CTSI of any subsequent extramural grant support obtained that is relevant to this grant funding.

Budgets:
Proposals must include budget and budget justification using NIH format, including personnel costs, specific planning activity costs and other support for key personnel. No indirect costs are allowed.

Award Date:
Funding will start on July 1, 2013 upon approval from CTSI and after all required documents are received by the Brain Research Institute. The award period will be for one year.

How to Apply:
Online CTSI website at http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu/Awards/TSATansNeuro/tsa-neuro-view
Please address questions related to this RFA, to Ms. Terry Novorr at tnovorr@mednet.ucla.edu

UCLA Brain Research Institute (BRI)
695 Charles E. Young Drive South #1506
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 825-5062 (Phone)
(310) 206-5855 (Fax)

UCLA / Charles Drew University (CDU)

UCLA / Charles Drew University (CDU) Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research / Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR/CHIME) and UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Pilot-study Awards.

  • Three (3) one-year pilot-study awards are available of up to a total of $40,000 each -- $20,000 funded from the UCLA / Charles Drew University (CDU) Resource Center for Minority Aging Research / Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR/CHIME) and $20,000 funded from the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).
  • Applications are accepted from junior-level, minority faculty researchers in academic institutions in Southern California, who are interested in conducting pilot research on minority elderly populations. We are particularly interested in researchers proposing to study African-American and Latino elders either in participatory research within local communities and/or using secondary data analyses.
  • Research should be consistent with the goal of the UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME, which is to provide a research infrastructure of training and mentoring junior-level minority faculty who can advance their academic careers by conducting pilot-study research that contributes to the reduction of health disparities affecting minority elders. Typically, pilot studies that are selected involve developing the evidence base or providing preliminary data for intervention trials that aim to address disparities in the health care of older minority populations. Ideally, these pilot studies will also demonstrate effective inter-institutional and/or academic-community partnerships.
  • Required application documents include a cover letter, a letter of intent, a current CV of applicant, and a current CV or NIH Biosketch of mentor(s).
  • Selection process of Letters of Intent will be based on:
    1. Meeting junior level faculty and race/ethnicity requirements;
    2. Credentials of applicant to conduct the proposed research;
    3. Qualifications of mentor(s) to assist the applicant with career development and/or research
    4. Quality of proposed pilot-study research and feasibility of it being completed within one year;
    5. Relatedness of proposed pilot-study research to the RCMAR/CHIME goal of supporting research that contributes to the reduction of health disparities affecting minority elder populations; and
    6. Likelihood that proposed research will lead to publication of at least one (1) first-authored, peer-reviewed manuscript plus subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health, particularly the National Institute on Aging.

    Full RFA details are available here:

    About UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME & the UCLA CTSI
    The UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME and the UCLA CTSI are based in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. RCMAR/CHIME is funded under NIH/NIA Grant Number 2P30AG021684, and the UCLA CTSI is funded under NIH/NCRR/NCATS Grant Number UL1TR000124.

    For information about UCLA/CDU RCMAR/CHIME, go to: http://www.chime.ucla.edu
    For information about the national RCMARs, go to: http://www.rcmar.ucla.edu

UCLA and the University of Minnesota Cross-Institutional Award

The Clinical and Translational Science Institutes (CTSIs) of UCLA and the University of Minnesota announce the 2012 Cross-Institutional Awards for Health Disparities Research and Health Systems Change. The awards are designed to improve health and health care in diverse communities through productive partnerships among researchers, clinicians, and community-based organizations.

Award Description

The Cross-Institutional Award for Health Disparities Research and Health Systems Change supports pilot projects that address health disparities and health systems problems of importance to Southern California and Minnesota. Awards are expected to lead to submission of an application for extramural funding. This opportunity will provide up to three, one-year awards of $50,000–$75,000 each.

Background

Translational research is focused on “translating” basic scientific discoveries into health interventions, and then moving those interventions into clinical practice to improve patient care and population health. Translational research aims to accelerate the pace of discovery, speed the application of new knowledge to novel prevention strategies, diagnostics and treatments, and transfer these innovations to health care providers and the public.

Clinical and Translational Science Institutes (CTSIs) provide the research infrastructure to support translational research. The CTSIs support pilot studies, train young researchers, and engage schools and communities in health improvement. The CTSI program is led by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.

An important goal of the CTSI program is to effectively engage communities in translational research. This RFA seeks projects in which community-based organizations participate fully with faculty in the research process. Research questions must be relevant to community needs and community organizations must be involved in the formulation, execution, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of the research.

RFA is available hereLetters of Intent are due by October 1, 2012Click here to submit your LOI.

Rapid Pilot Funding Available for Aging-Related Research

The UCLA Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) and the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) are soliciting applications for the Rapid Grants Program for aging-related basic, clinical and health services research. Award size will range from $1,000 to $10,000, dependent on scope of work. The Principal Investigator must be a UCLA junior faculty member or advanced trainee. Priority will be given to investigators who have not been prior recipients of OAIC funding. Funds will be awarded for this opportunity as long as they are available. However, all funds must be spent by June, 30 2012.

For more information, please click here.

UCLA CTSI-Los Angeles County Department of Health Services Collaboration Grants

UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute-Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS) Collaboration Grants provide up to $30,000 for a period of one year to test solutions that enable LAC DHS to improve and increase delivery of high quality, patient-centered services without increasing costs.  UCLA CTSI and LAC DHS anticipate making up to five (5) awards.

For information about deadlines, eligibility and requirements and the review process, please see the RFA.

This round of applications are due February 15, 2013 at 5:00 pm, 2013, Pacific Time.  Click here for details and to apply.

Primary Contact
Dion Baybridge

(310) 794-7374


How to co-fund a Team Science Award

Team Science Awards support, multidisciplinary teams and enable them to obtain preliminary data for extramural grants. They are co-funded by CTSI and other entities (e.g., departments or centers) and issued in amounts ranging from $25,000 to $200,000 for one or two years. They are non-renewable and awarded through competitive, peer-review using an open RFA.

Partnering with CTSI

To initiate the process, a department, center, ORU, etc. must send a letter of intent (LOI) to Dion Baybridge, Director of Research at the David Geffen School of Medicine, at dbaybridge@mednet.ucla.edu.

The LOI must include:

  1. the scientific focus of the proposed RFA
  2. an administrative leadership plan
  3. total award and total non-CTSI co-funding (minimum non-CTSI share is 50% of award)

Previous Team Science Awards

CTSI has partnered with departments, centers to develop Team Science RFAs and issue competitive, peer- reviewed, co-funded awards. Examples include:

  • CTSI-UCLA Department of Medicine, Division of Anesthesiology
    • Yibin Wang, “Systems Genetics of Heart Failure: Paving the Road to Translation.”
  • CTSI-UCLA Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease
    • Debika Bhattacharya, “Cardiovascular and Metabolic Complications of HIV and HCV Co-Infection”
  • CTSI-UCLA Department of Human Genetics
    • Steve Horvath, “Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for HIV-Associated Non-AIDS (HANA) Condition”

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